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Pow-Wows; or Long Lost Friend

Narrated by: Leo McQueen
Length: 2 hrs and 20 mins
Categories: History, American
2 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

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Publisher's Summary

Pow-Wows; or Long Lost Friend was published in 1820. John George Hohman (often misspelled as Hoffman) was a Pennsylvania Dutch healer. This work comprises home and folk remedies, as well as spells and talismans. The folk magic tradition known as "pow-wowing" takes its name from the title of later editions of the book.

Public Domain (P)2019 Museum Audiobooks

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History of Medicine in the early U.S.

Story begins with a warning not to try these “remedies/cures” at home. The preface is boring, super religious, the author claims he can use every patient as a testimonial and claims to know them all by name and location. This audiobook made me very grateful for HIPPA and current medical standards in the U.S.A.

I didn’t get more than 20 minutes into this audiobook before I was over it. Great history lesson for people curious about old school “medical” treatments in the U.S.A.

The remedies I did listen to instructed the ill person, or a relative, to carry out rituals that were crazy, unnecessary, and superstitious, usually accompanied by saying religious words or phrases, or making the sign of the cross at a specific time in the remedy/ritual.

Aside from being shocked by the insanity of quack doctors and their scam medicine from the early U.S., the narrator is tolerable, the remedies for ailments were crazy ridiculous, and I thought some of the ailments themselves were hilarious.

You’d be amazed at how often people got a wheel to the eye!