adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B0821SC3ZP
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B0821SC3ZP

Try our newest plan – unlimited listening to select audiobooks, Audible Originals, and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
$7.95 a month after 30 day trial. Upgrade or cancel anytime.
Buy for $39.95

Buy for $39.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Main Selection of the History Book Club

The Battle of Gettysburg, the Civil War's turning point, produced over 57,000 casualties, the largest number from the entire war that was itself America's bloodiest conflict. On the third day of fierce fighting, Robert E. Lee's attempt to invade the North came to a head in Pickett's Charge. The infantry assault, consisting of nine brigades of soldiers in a line that stretched for over a mile, resulted in casualties of over 50 percent for the Confederates and a huge psychological blow to Southern morale.

Pickett's Charge is a detailed analysis of one of the most iconic and defining events in American history. This book presents a much-needed fresh look, including the unvarnished truths and ugly realities, about the unforgettable story. With the luxury of hindsight, historians have long denounced the folly of Lee's attack, but this work reveals the tactical brilliance of a master plan that went awry. Special emphasis is placed on the common soldiers on both sides, especially the non-Virginia attackers outside of Pickett's Virginia Division. These fighters' moments of cowardice, failure, and triumph are explored using their own words from primary and unpublished sources. Without romance and glorification, the complexities and contradictions of the dramatic story of Pickett's Charge have been revealed in full to reveal this most pivotal moment in the nation's life.

Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for listeners interested in history - books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times best seller or a national best seller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

©2016 Phillip Thomas Tucker (P)2016 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about Pickett's Charge

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    25
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    9
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    28
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    6
Story
  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    24
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    8
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    10

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

BAD!!!!!!

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narrator is the only positive I can give this book. Unfortunately he was saddled with a terrible book

Any additional comments?

Tucker's work is one of the worst I have come across. I admire Lee as much the next guy but Tucker give's Douglas Southall Freeman a run for his money. His arguments should make most students of Civil War military history cringe. His writing style is an excellent example of how not to write a modern military history. I'm just glad I didn't spend the $$ for a hardback of this work. If I could have given less than one star I would have.

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Charge?

Long, long account of Pickett’s charge. Highly detailed, to the point of too much. Sets a record for the use of “therefore”, pronounced “thereFORE” by the reader. The book seems full of questionable and contradictory conclusions. On one page the Yankees are demoralized and fleeing and a couple pages later driving the Rebels back.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Worst CW book ever. Can't rate it low enough. It deserves negative 5 stars in all categories

This is the worst book about a CW battle
I have listened to,. Author claims a Phd but it must be horticulture are some interest far fromhistory, I don't know where Tucker is from but I am betting either Virginia or NC. Even that is no excuse for the absurd and glaring inaccuracies in this train wreck of a book.
In keeping with the pathetic lost cause tradition, Lee is the brilliant southern gentlemen whose army is poor in material but overflowing with nobility and
Courage while northern troops are the dregs
Of northern big city life. One southerner is worth 10 Yankees, etc ad nauseum.
This is a "new look" at Gettysburg alright, but is a look so fake and dishonest as to be pure fiction.
In truth in this major battle the Union leaders did almost everything right, while Lee and subordinates were slow and misjudged essentially everything,. Lee never had a chance to win this battle. They might have briefly gained a piece of the stone wall, but success means keeping it and expanding it. They never had a chance to do either and were decimated. The author makes saintly figured out of every fallen rebel as if dying bravely was the goal. This is the worst CW book ever written. You'd be better off
Getting "The Killer Angels" which even as admittedly "historical fiction" is more accurate than this rag. His worship of VMI gets tiresome, especially when we realize it was purely bad leadership that put the boy cadets in harms way in the first place. He writes as if VMI is the greatest of military schools of the era and then admits it was modeled after West Point. Plus, the VMI grads at Gettysburg lost so completely that detecting any military expertise amongst would have been a challenge.
This book was a waste of time and money. I'll be returning it.

Richard
Bergen


5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The horrors of war.

The author has put together an account of Pickett's charge that gives the reader a better understanding of the battle than any other writings. It gives a vivid picture of what the participants encountered, the horrific side of war in words of those fighting the war. I would encourage anyone interested in Civil War accounts read, or listen to the book

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

If Pickett had won, it still wouldn't be any good

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

perhaps a book actually covering the topic

What was most disappointing about Phillip Thomas Tucker PhD’s story?

excessively boring on a topic thought impossible

What didn’t you like about Eric Martin’s performance?

I suppose some of it is the stuff he's given to work with

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Pickett's Charge?

Everything from the end of July 2 1863

Any additional comments?

it's not very good, and that means you won't like it

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Amazing

So many facts not known by me, nor taught in school. So much sadness. So many opportunities missed. This was well worth the time.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Confederate Apologist

Why not say Union Calvery was the blame. And the Union soldiers were to blame! The author gives far to much time in "If Onlys". As if only Lee would of relieved Vicksburg Vicksburg would of been saved. If only Little Mac followed up the battle of Antietam there would of been no battle of Gettysburg. My Dear Mr. Tucker P. H. D. your theory of what ifs is a complete explanation for every lost battle. An while it's fun too conjecture it is a weak explanation for all lost battles we wish would of been different.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Waste of time. Biased.

Another attempt to say it wasn’t Lee’s fault. This book is also repetitive, painfully repetitive. The author shows bias throughout. If you don’t want to read “Lost Cause” book, pass on this one.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Academic not popular history

I am quite sure that’s the research in this book was impeccable he was probably at PhD thesis edited for publication as such it was informative and highly factual but not particularly enjoyable to read or listen to. The narrator had a pleasant voice but quite honestly, the book was too fact Leiden and dry. For academic purposes it’s probably the best study ever done on pickets charge. It is certainly not popular History.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A Different Perspective

This was a good look at Pickett's Charge. The narration was excellent. The author bucks what is traditionally believed that the charge was doomed and that it was folly to try. Tucker clearly details why it was not folly to launch the charge. The narration was excellent. The key was to have the infantry, cavalry, and artillery work together to achieve success. Unfortunately, two of these three keys failed their mission. The artillery wasted their ammunition on the initial attack intended to soften up the Union positions. When supporting fire was needed during the charge there was little to be able to support the charge. The calvary never made it into the fight. The author really never gave an account of why J.E.B. Stuart didn't carry out his orders. It seems he met resistance from newly minted General George Armstrong Custer. The author notes that General Robert E. Lee was a student of Napoleonic tactics. His plan was to use his forces in unison. However, as we know from history it didn't work out that way. As noted above, it would have been helpful to know why Stuart failed in his mission. Perhaps that's a book for another day. The author also took other historians to task for claiming the charge was a bad decision that should never have been attempted. While history does prove that it didn't work as planned, it was not doomed from the outset. As with many battle plans that look good on paper. They don't always work out in practice. This book demonstrates that and more!

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for paul hadfeild
  • paul hadfeild
  • 09-02-18

Another brown nosing for general Lee .

This book is a good listen and does dispel lots of the rubbish written about pickets charge backed up with evidence .
However allot of time is devoted to "the brilliant battle plan in lee's mind " at one point he says no evidence exsists of this two pincer attack !
This book is determined to push the legacy of general lee as the American napoloen well not only that he says over and over that he his better than Napoleon . Napoleon was not beaten by accident wellington Had never lost against napoleon 's forces and beat him the only time he came up against him .
The big glearing thing about this is where was general lee you get the impression he was sitting in a darkened room with his eyes shut throughout the whole battle maybe thinking about his amazing plan he didn't bother to tell everyone about as his artillery wasted all it's amo over three hours instead of the 15 minutes he had asked for !!and the rest of his plan didn't happen because of the generals under him at no point did he step in, and what plan survives contact with the enemy anyway ,were was lees flexibility ? he didn't have any because this amazing general had got rid of his artillery reserve and sent his caverlry off to act independently.
I am sorry but general Lee was not the god these books keep trying to tell us he was .

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jon Smith
  • Jon Smith
  • 10-19-20

Biased

If you are looking for a book about the Civil War written by a Lost Cause supporter this is the book for you. Many of the accusation aimed at Longstreet many years ago and subsequently discounted are brought up here again. I get the feeling that the author penned this with a large portrait of Lee in his office looking down on him.
The detail of people taking part in the charge itself is really good, well researched info. However it seems that any Federal background is discounted if it's not a quote of defeat.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Mark h
  • Mark h
  • 01-20-18

Masterful In-depth and captivating

Though this book is very long it holds you with every chapter. It is very in depth with first hand accounts to put to rest over a century of myth and misunderstanding.

The story of Pickett’s Charge was only one part of a three day battle but was the defining moment of the battle and like many battles before was close to being a victory

Well worth the read and the narration is easy to listen to and the first hand accounts make the story come to life.