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Publisher's Summary

In this newly revised 25th anniversary edition, acclaimed writer and journalist Vivian Gornick interviews famous and lesser-known scientists, compares their experiences then and now, and shows that, although not much has changed in the world of science, what is different is women’s expectations that they can and will succeed.

Everything from the disparaging comments by Harvard’s then-president to government reports and media coverage has focused on the ways in which women supposedly can’t do science. Gornick’s original interviews show how deep and severe discrimination against women was back then in all scientific fields. Her new interviews, with some of the same women she spoke to 25 years ago, provide a fresh description of the hard times and great successes these women have experienced.

©2009 Vivian Gornick (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Strongly felt, vigorously written." (The Women’s Review of Books)
"Gornick’s portraits demonstrate the driving force behind science." (The Philadelphia Inquirer)
"Opens the discussion about women’s diverse problems and ambitions in science." (The New York Times Book Review)

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Non-science perspective of science

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

As a woman in science myself (PhD in Engineering) I find this book to be an obscure interpretation of a scientist's plight. The author blatantly puts words in her interviewee's mouth to fit her perspective of the field. She goes on strange rants about "science is all about being right" and how women just want to be believed.
There are some interesting parts about current ideas and scandals at the time around women in science.