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Publisher's Summary

Institutionalism is an economic point of view that emphasizes the role of social organization and structure in modern economic life. Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929), an American son of Norwegian immigrants, was instrumental in creating this school of thought in the early twentieth century, and he vigorously attacked what he regarded as the privileged "leisure class" in America.

To institutionalists, the important "institutions" of economic life include customs, habits, morals, and laws. These are believed to be more important in shaping economic life than are marketplace principles. Institutionalists emphasize a historical interpretation of social life, asserting that economic generalizations should be relevant to time and place. Institutionalist ideas greatly influenced economic policies that were created in response to the Great Depression.

©1988 by Carmichael & Carmichael, Inc. / Knowledge Products; (P)Blackstone Audiobooks

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a terrible book

What would have made Thorstein Veblen and Institutionalism better?

The script is terrible, and made worse by the goofy narration. Every time Veblen is quoted the narrator assumes a bad Norwegian accent.

What was most disappointing about Dr. William Peterson’s story?

This book is about Peterson's dislike of Veblen; it is not about Veblen's ideas. It is not a critical analysis, but a character assassination.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful