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Publisher's Summary

The record industry as we know it is dying. But the music industry is healthier and more vibrant than ever, with limitless possibilities for change and growth due to the Internet and the digitization of music.

The Future of Music will show you cool new ways to find music and connect with your favorite artists. Discover the Top-10 truths about the music business of the future and how you can benefit from the explosion in digital music, today and tomorrow.

The Future of Music punches gaping holes through the foundation of a record industry that refuses to adapt.

  • The best-selling CD of 2004 is blank and recordable.
  • Blink-182's best-selling single of all time was "launched" on EA's Madden 2004 video game.
  • File-sharing can be the savior of the music industry.
  • The artists are the brands, and entertainment is the main attraction.
  • Radio is no longer the primary way that people discover new music.
  • The record business is NOT the record business.
  • ©2005 Dave Kusek and Gerd Leonhard; (P)2005 Berklee Media, a division of Berklee College of Music

    Critic Reviews

    "Clearly written and groundbreaking." (Publishers Weekly)

    What members say

    Average Customer Ratings

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    • Overall
    • chris
    • Kelowna, BC, Canada
    • 10-01-06

    Should be The Future of Music Industry

    If you are expecting predictions as to what music will "sound" like, as I was, you will be disappointed. This is all about the music industry, not music itself. However the book sums up recent music industry history very well, and shines light into a lot of dark corners. It shows the RIAA fight against Napster et al as the short-sighted self-protectionist farce we all knew it was, and how current industry practices are driving customers toward file sharing instead of away.

    Then the book moves on to talk about what music could and should be like to ensure the future of the industry. Very interesting reading, and some novel parallels with water, but I doubt this book will influence anyone. It works better to enlighten the masses as to where the industry is already heading.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

    • Overall
    • Timothy
    • Melrose, MA, USA
    • 06-11-05

    VERY Dissappointing

    This book is extremely dissappointing. The logic and underlying philosophy is overly simplistic and utopian. Basically this is a 7 hour diatribe on the merits of a revamped IP system with no sound rationale behind it other than "music as water". If the authors' had any understanding of the global water industry and its history they would understand how idiotic their comparison is. The WORST book I have gotten at Audible out of 20 or so books.

    Even my wife who is not technical at all said this book was terrible and overly simplistic.

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful

    • Overall
    • Chris
    • Brooklyn, NY, United States
    • 03-03-11

    eh?

    If you can get past the fact that the book is written in a completely optimistic and under researched manner and that the narration is just plain awful, you will find some cool stuff.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful

    • Overall

    Not groundbreaking, but interesting

    The authors of this book lack a clear understanding of history or economics, and do not clearly describe a view of the future. They summarize their message with the slogan, "Music flowing like water." The idea is simply that songs cost only a matter of cents, are licensed more freely, and are everywhere, just as tap water is cheap and nearly universally available today. This is an intruiging basis for a book, but one that they don't really flesh out, instead talking about individual technological advances in wireless technology, bandwidth, and peer-to-peer file-sharing. Nothing really new.

    One problem they don't address is, what's so different between their hypothetical "water" paradigm and current services such as iTunes, other than the price? Currently, record companies are pushing Apple to raise the cost of songs on iTunes (currently 99 cents); it seems highly unlikely that they will be lowered. To say that the dramatic reduction of the price of songs is inevitable seems very optimistic in a climate where the profits of online music stores are increasing dramatically, and CD sales also continue to be profitable, if less so than they were prior to the advent of file-sharing.

    If the predictions of the authors do come true, it will be decades from now, not years.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful

    • Overall
    • Lee
    • Newcastle, WA, USA
    • 05-30-05

    OMG THIS IS GOOD!

    I hiiiiighly recommend anyone even remotely involved with music, listen to this. I'm very excited about the situation the major record labels find themselves in, and the possibilities open to artists and music listeners thanks to mp3s and broadband.

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful