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Publisher's Summary

De Brevitate Vitae (English: On the Shortness of Life), written sometime around the year 49 AD by Seneca the Younger, discusses many Stoic principles on the nature of time and humanity itself. Enjoy riveting discussions and perspectives on these themes as Seneca delves into your thoughts. You will be fascinated as you explore one of the greatest minds and his perception of how we should perceive time. Many of the truths you will find in this piece are not only timeless, but pertinent to humanity - even to this day.

"People are frugal in guarding their personal property, but as soon as it comes to squandering time, they are most wasteful of the one thing in which it is right to be stingy."

©2017 Bassett Publishing (P)2017 Bassett Publishing

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Rich formal text

What made the experience of listening to On the Shortness of Life: Stoic Principles for Self-Improvement the most enjoyable?

The nice baritone vocal was very engaging. There was an appropriate inflection in the voice that kept you engaged.

What did you like best about this story?

I enjoyed the more formal English and references to subjects not heard of today. The wording was such that you had to pay attention and listen to understand the content.

Which scene was your favorite?

I enjoyed where it was pointed out that if a person has to be told they are sitting that they did not have the ability to function in life and needed to stop being so lazy (paraphrased to my own words)

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There was not a particular moment that stood out, however, the entire book provided "food for thought"

Any additional comments?

There were two places where wording cut up a bit but that could have been the wifi signal, but I am not positive.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful