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Publisher's Summary

Internationally renowned psychiatrist, Viktor E. Frankl, endured years of unspeakable horror in Nazi death camps. During, and partly because of, his suffering, Dr. Frankl developed a revolutionary approach to psychotherapy known as logotherapy. At the core of his theory is the belief that man's primary motivational force is his search for meaning.

Man's Search for Meaning is more than a story of Viktor E. Frankl's triumph: it is a remarkable blend of science and humanism and an introduction to the most significant psychological movement of our day.

©1959, 1962, 1984 Viktor E. Frankl (P)1995 Blackstone Audiobooks

Critic Reviews

"An enduring work of survival literature." (The New York Times)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
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When Faced by Life's Destitutions

Man's Search for Meaning, by Viktor E. Frankl and read by Simon Vance. Life does not always provide solace. In fact, it often disheartens us with the difficulty and even horrific circumstances that get thrown upon the innocent. Frankl, is a man who suffered the worst of circumstances, being a resident of the Nazi death camps.

What is it that kept Dr. Frankl going? What made him a renowned neurologist and psychiatrist, what was his experience in the Nazi concentration camps? What is it he offers us in facing our own life difficulties.

Frankl believed that people are primarily driven by a "striving to find meaning in one's life," and that finding a sense of meaning enables people to overcome painful experiences. If you need support for overcoming life’s impediments; this is a self-help book that should not be passed upon.

Self-help reads sometime are full of themselves and purposeless. Here is humility, compassion for all humanity and a methodology (Logotherapy) to make the search and challenge your inner difficulties.

The read is very involving, uplifts the soul, and provides sustenance. The reader, Simon Vance, is very simply amongst Audible’s best. He never fails to read with perfection. This is a read you should undertake.

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not bad

not sure if you are looking for the first time in the morning and evening and the other hand is not an issue...

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Stopped me in my tracks.

Never has a book moved me to tears and joy, and deep appreciation for the human soul as this book. VE Frankl is one of those rare angels who move amongst us and speaks to each of us as an individual. You must read this book.

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Amazing and Spiritually Uplifting

Philosophical treaties on man's search for meaning in the backdrop of Nazi death camps. How one man managed to keep his humanity in the face of the greatest of inhumanity. Not at all what I expected, but what I found was a gem and well worth the dedicated listen.
AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

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Realistic comfort

Hear about reasoning for suffering from a man that endured so much in the concentration camps and life beyond

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Mind Opener

THE BAD
What annoyed me a little bit was the last 30% or so of the book. Don't get me wrong, it is explained in the beginning how it's going to go down, that it'll start with a recollection of overall camp life with the objective of allowing for psychological analysis, which ensues in the latter part. I get it that I'm probably not the intended audience 9with no previous background whatsoever to the subject), and that is probably where my problem lies with the book. After the stories are kind of done, the deeper (if one can even say that given how short the book actually is) or more academic side of it comes into play. At this point, even though the author interweaves some short example stories as he goes, I confess it was a bit hard to follow for a layman. For this reason, the book drops a few points in my opinion. That being said, due to my inexperience on the topic, I can't really review the actual academic part and judge whether or not it is remotely relevant or not.

THE GOOD
The stories are fantastic. The positive approach is fantastic. The fact that this is not heavily focused on the abominable concentration camps nor on the psychology academic subject only, but rather a mix of both is fantastic (at least for an audience such as myself, completely new to the topic). You get to know of these hideous happenings and how these unfortunate amazing individuals learned to cope with it. Eventually you question yourself and own life. It is impossible to drop the book and have lunch, or a simple shower, or look out the window, in the same way again. At least I know I haven't. Listening to only the few horrors described here (mind you none of it is graphic nor gory in anyway... quite the opposite). one is relived to put the book down and reflect on its own freedom and existence. I'd risk saying this might be the case, no matter how hard his or her condition is. It'd be very unlikely to be worse than what these people endured. For this reason, that it is powerful enough to make you want to see good everywhere, and maybe rethink some of one's life, it gets praises in my opinion

THE VERDICT
I'd recommend this book to everyone. Really. So you are a concentration camp history buff? Alright, but have you heard of it from the positive point of view already (as much as this could be said of such scenario)? So you're an academic on the related topics? Ok, but how deep have you studied these along with true and fascinating stories from true heroes? Done both of those and are also very familiar with your world war 2 history as well? Ok, so maybe you've been there before. Maybe none of it will sound all that new or unheard of in the end. However, given it is such a short book, I still say give it a go if you're at all interested in the camp stories alone. That's what called out to me in the first place. You will not regret it, and I'd almost guarantee you will not end it on an impartial mindset towards your own life.

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humbled and inspired

brilliant mind. Brilliant words. amazing Outlook on the worst scenario ever bestowed upon men. his attitude was heroic and it's something that I will take with me as I live my life on a daily basis.

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Most valuable book ever read

I listen to it every morning. It helps me to be responsible individual and enjoy life.

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Wisdom from someone who walked the walk!

Amazing book! So inspiring, so motivational.
The content here is useful for anyone, no matter what they are going through in their lives at the moment. The story about the concentration camp was informative, but what followed, the philosophy of logotherapy, was incredibly powerful!
Particularly the end of part one onward, it was golden bit of knowledge after golden bit. This book is absolutely mindblowing in many ways, and it reminds us of so many frameworks that can be used practically. The real world examples made it relevant and applicable to my own life.

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excellent book about the strength of human will

a book that details the power of human will, and the importance of each individual finding a meaning/purpose for their existence no matter how trivial it might be perceived by someone else. A short yet very powerful book, we'll worth the listen/read