Regular price: $20.99

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

A new compilation of essays and articles from novelist William Gibson, offering listeners a privileged view into the mind of a writer whose thinking has shaped our culture.

©2012 William Gibson Enterprises Limited (P)2012 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"A provocative, surprising look at the lesser-known parts of a sci-fi superstar's writing career." (Kirkus)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    48
  • 4 Stars
    35
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    1

Performance

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    37
  • 4 Stars
    30
  • 3 Stars
    13
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 4.1 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    39
  • 4 Stars
    27
  • 3 Stars
    15
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    1
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Revelation of a complex mind -- YES

This is a book of essays and speeches compiled from various sources, with Gibson's commentary from today's perspective. It's a fascinating journey into a complex mind that begins to reveal the source material for his novels. As a writer, I'm going to listen to it again (and again), with a notebook in hand. In the NY Times book review, Pagan Kennedy says, "Gibson's writing enters the bloodstream like a drug, producing a mild hallucinogenic effect that lasts for hours." Yes.

I was less satisfied with the narrator Robertson Dean. I felt that the text called for someone speaking more conversationally. Dean is orotund and begins to sound robotic. I don't know what Gibson himself sounds like, but I wanted it to be him reading and talking to me. Dean doesn't by any means ruin the experience (so get this book!), but it could have been so much more intimate an experience with Gibson himself.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Mostly for Gibson Fans

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I would have enjoyed hearing more.

What do you think your next listen will be?

The Art of Fielding

Which scene was your favorite?

Gibson's description of his experience of Tokyo

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No. It's episodic non-fiction without a unifying thread that might tie a documentary together.

Any additional comments?

Narrator Robertson Dean's voice and style is familiar from Gibson fiction titles he's performed. In general, I think it suits the material well, though in this non-fiction title, it's the writer himself he's portraying, and I think at times Dean comes off as more callow than I like to imagine Gibson being.<br/><br/>For fans of Gibson's fiction, this collection of short, non-fiction work gives a worthwhile look behind the scenes at the places and impressions that start his creative engine running. As it is more nearly journalism than anything else, it lacks the depth and startling cognitive associations that I much admire in his fiction. If you are new to Gibson, this is not the place to start. Better to listen to Neuromancer from the vanguard of cyberpunk, or Pattern Recognition for an all too plausible GIbsonian near-future.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

This insightful book really needs chapter titles

Some of Gibson's essays are insightful, and Robertson Dean's masterful reading makes this audiobook a pleasure to listen to.

Unfortunately, however, I cannot recommend that you spend a credit on this audiobook, for one simple reason: Audible.com's client contains no chapter titles.

This book is the poster child for missing chapter titles. Each "chapter" is actually a short essay, reprinted from some other source, such as the forward of a published book, or some past edition of a magazine.

In Audible's client, all we get is "Chapter 1," "Chapter 2," etc., but we really need chapter titles in order to be able to navigate through this volume.

Come on, Audible.com, it's 2016. When are we going to get textual chapter titles in our audiobooks? 2017? 2018?

Dead-tree publishers would never dream of abandoning an author's chapter titles when printing a book. I see no reason whatever why Audible.com's audiobooks meed to abandon chapter titles.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Not what I expected

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

This is a collection of essays that left me flat.

What do you think your next listen will be?

I will listen to the novels--William Gibson is a great novelist, but this writing wasn't compelling.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jonathan
  • Kalamazoo, MI, United States
  • 07-12-12

Gibson is an enigma - enjoy his particular Flavor

Would you consider the audio edition of Distrust That Particular Flavor to be better than the print version?

Yes. These are great snapshots, not only of the creative process, but a good look into Gibson's unique perceptions - he is not so much hard-sci-fi as he is social-sci. As his work matured he became more aware of the science around him and the social consequences thereof.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Gibson himself - a fascinating, humble man.

Which character – as performed by Robertson Dean – was your favorite?

Gibson.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

His admitting that he new very little of the cutting edge technology and that his work was more speculative - he look at human behavior in the advent of this technology

Any additional comments?

Read it! if you love Gibson, or if you want a fresh perspective on the creator of a good sci-fi.<br/>author.