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Publisher's Summary

The gruesome murder of hopeful starlet Elizabeth Short, in the noir-tinged Los Angeles of 1947, has a permanent place in American lore as one of the most inscrutable of true-crime mysteries. Now, Piu Eatwell - relentless legal sleuth and atmospheric stylist - cracks the case after 70 years. With recently unredacted FBI files, newly released sections of the LAPD files, and explosive new interviews, Eatwell has unprecedented access to primary evidence and a persuasive culprit. She layers her findings into a gritty, cinematic retelling of the case from the corrupt LAPD and the take-no-prisoners press to the seedy underworld of would-be actresses and the men who preyed on them. In mesmerizing prose, Black Dahlia, Red Rose is a panorama of 1940s Hollywood, a definitive account of one of the biggest unsolved murders of American legal history.

©2017 Piu Eatwell (P)2017 HighBridge, a Division of Recorded Books

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Slightly disappointing

I'd hoped that this would book would put together a comprehensive alternative theory of the crime that could create questions. Unfortunately, it merely presents someone who may be a significant suspect and supports the accusation with a lot of circumstantial evidence that even the author has to qualify as supposition in many cases. A lot of stuff along the lines of: we can't prove it was Elizabeth Short in that hotel, but nobody can prove it wasn't. Which is to say, the author may be right, but can't really sell it.

Of greater was concern was the dismissiveness in the discussion of other suspects, specifically George Hodel. Again, while some of the criticism of the Steve Hodel book may have merit, this author doesn't hold that critical mirror to her own work.

And stylistically, though we are forewarned, the book has the cheap scent of film noir fandom, naming all the chapters on a film noir theme. And there are more than a few tangents that take the listener out of the strict brief of the book, presumably to provide atmosphere.

Not uninteresting, but just falls short of the mark.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Finally

This book was informative, well written and the audible narration was enjoyable. For the first time I feel I have real answers to many of my questions about Elizabeth Short's murder and a few suspicions confirmed. Thank you Piu Eatwell.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful