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Publisher's Summary

The "absorbing and powerful" (Wall Street Journal) story of two pioneering suffragette doctors who shattered social expectations and transformed modern medicine during World War I

A month after war broke out in 1914, doctors Flora Murray and Louisa Garrett Anderson set out for Paris, where they opened a hospital in a luxury hotel and treated hundreds of casualties plucked from France's battlefields. Although, prior to the war and the Spanish flu, female doctors were restricted to treating women and children, Flora and Louisa's work was so successful that the British Army asked them to set up a hospital in the heart of London. Nicknamed the Suffragettes' Hospital, Endell Street soon became known for its lifesaving treatments.

In No Man's Land, Wendy Moore illuminates this turbulent moment of global war and pandemic when women were, for the first time, allowed to operate on men. Their fortitude and brilliance serve as powerful reminders of what women can achieve against all odds.

©2020 Wendy Moore (P)2020 Hachette Audio

Critic Reviews

"The story of the extraordinary women who ran the 'Suffragettes' Hospital' is visceral, timely, urgent, and spellbinding. Wendy Moore's book is utterly involving and deeply thought-provoking, and all I can do is urge you to read it." (Helen Castor, author of She-Wolves and Joan of Arc)

"How can a spectacular story like No Man's Land just disappear? Luckily for us, it fell into the hands of one of our finest biographers. Wendy Moore's rich storyteller's voice has brought back the lives and achievements of these brave and brilliant women." (Andrea Wulf, author of The Invention of Nature and Founding Gardeners)

"No Man's Land is an absolute delight. Wendy Moore has performed an incredible feat of historical detective work, and the result is a gripping account of courage and determination in the face of death. It is impossible not to love the 'suffragette surgeons' as they fought for the wounded abroad and for women's rights at home." (Amanda Foreman, author of The Duchess and A World on Fire)

What listeners say about No Man's Land

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Disappointing to me

Having read Sarah Lyall's NYTimes review, I began this audiobook with great anticipation that was not fulfilled. How many times can the author state it was remarkable that these women ran hospitals in France and one of the best in the U.K. during WWI? Yes, I accept the importance of the accomplishment, that is why I am reading the book.

As a retired anesthesiologist I looked forward to details of clinical care or hospital organization, but this book seemed based on letters and diaries of participants. WWI was a slog, and I found this book to be the same.

Additionally, the large roster of women working at the hospital was tough for me to follow in the audio format. I'd have had an easier time reading about them.

Yes, the book mentions the horror of the arrival of many deaths from influenza just as the war wound down, but even in this account I found few interesting details.

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Very informative

Decisions on a person’s ability based on a person’s sex, race, religion, or national origin just baffles me and has all my 70+ years

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Important material, too repetitive

Like another reviewer, I was inspired by the review in The New York Times Book Review to listen to this book. And, like that other reviewer, I was disappointed. The topic is important. I am a feminist and have been as early as I can remember (going back to kindergarten, though I didn’t know the word then) and certainly relate to being faced with unequal access as a woman, and I certainly appreciate the story of these women who served the Allies in WWI and who were pioneering women in the field of medicine (and don’t forget the support staff). I knew more about these same problems faced by women in WWII - not being treated equally, not being paid equally or given equal rank, not receiving veterans benefits, etc., and returning men replacing women, many of whom loved their jobs and needed to support themselves, too. So I am now aware how much history repeated itself regarding the treatment of women during wartime. But I found that the information was extremely repetitive. I think all the points could have been made, the remarkable achievements, how well the hospital was run, how it was staffed entirely by women, in half the time or less. The book needed a good editor to tell the author to consolidate or find another way to organize it so that we don’t have to keep hearing (or reading) the same points over and over. Though the narrator did a fine enough job, I would think that since the author is English (or I think so - she lives in London), the characters were primarily English and the events took place in England or in France, but under the auspices of the British, that the narrator would have been British. So now I found out that there is a British version of the book called Endell Street, narrated by a British narrator. I would have preferred that. I never get why two editions (with two narrations) of the same book are published. Two editions, I can get, because in print the spelling might be different. But two narrations? Anyway, if you want a British narrator, go for the British edition.

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Fascinating history of women in medicine

A very interesting look at the intersection of suffragettes in England, a history of women in the medical field in England, and the WWI need for medical personnel.

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Female heros of Sufferage, War work, and equality

An amazing history of powerful queer women who's lives and policy advocacy effect us to this day. Fighting for Suffrage, equal work, equal pay, and medical contribution to the war effort- they changed the outcome of the war and the world going forward. They lived by the Suffrage motto, Deeds Not Words and gave it true meaning.