Regular price: $39.93

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The Lost Symbol, the stunning follow-up to The Da Vinci Code, is a masterstroke of storytelling - a deadly race through a real-world labyrinth of codes and unseen truths...all under the watchful eye of a terrifying villain. Set within the unseen tunnels and temples of Washington, D.C., The Lost Symbol accelerates through a startling landscape toward an unthinkable finale.

Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is summoned to deliver an evening lecture in the U.S. Capitol. Within minutes of his arrival, the night takes a bizarre turn. A disturbing object - artfully encoded with five ancient symbols - is discovered in the Capitol Building. The object is an ancient invitation, meant to usher its recipient into a long-lost world of hidden esoteric wisdom. And when Langdon's mentor Peter Solomon - prominent Mason and philanthropist - is kidnapped, Langdon's only hope of saving Peter is to accept this invitation and follow wherever it leads him. Langdon finds himself plunged into a clandestine world of Masonic secrets, hidden history, and never-before-seen locations...all of which seem to be dragging him toward a single, inconceivable truth.

The Lost Symbol is exactly what Dan Brown's fans have been waiting for...his most thrilling novel yet.

©2009 Dan Brown; (P)2009 Random House Audio

Critic Reviews

"[I]mpossible to put down....Mr. Brown was writing sensational visual scenarios long before his books became movie material. This time he again enlivens his story with amazing imagery....Thanks to him, picture postcards of the capital's most famous monuments will never be the same....In the end it is Mr. Brown's sweet optimism, even more than Langdon's sleuthing and explicating, that may amaze his readers most." (The New York Times)
"Thrilling, entertaining....Robert Langdon goes for another roller-coaster ride - this time in a hunt for a Masonic treasure in Washington, D.C." (Los Angeles Times)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    944
  • 4 Stars
    1,093
  • 3 Stars
    848
  • 2 Stars
    384
  • 1 Stars
    289

Performance

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 3.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Rob
  • Brentwood, CA United States
  • 12-06-09

We waited for this?

This book was formulaic, predictable and I think Dan Brown sold out on the ending. Perhaps he was tired of getting criticized by the religious crowd over The Da Vinci Code. I was disappointed. The whole book built up to the expectation of an exciting revelation and then fizzled. It left me thinking "I can't believe I waited for that."

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Same Ole, Same Ole

Seeing as I had enjoyed the first two books in this trilogy, I was very excited to read the third. Going into the book, I already knew that I would need to suspend my disbelief a bit and endure a somewhat negative view of organized religion or in the case of this book organized fraternities. I was not disappointed. I liked that the book was filled with the usual character types. Robert Langdon was doing his usual thing: solving puzzles, following clues, and charming the intelligent, yet attractive woman in the story. There is the usual race against time and the usual enlightenment that comes at the end. Maybe the problem is that this book is too usual and too much like the previous two. There is another aspect of this novel that bothered me. Without giving away too much, I can say that amidst this aforementioned race against time Langdon would stop periodically and for different reasons to explain the puzzle or review the history of something. He would be running to get somewhere or get away from someone as he usually does and then simply stop for 30 minutes to explain how he solved the puzzle. For me, it really screwed with the flow of the story. On a more positive note, Brown really kept me guessing until the end which came an hour before the novel was actually ready to be wrapped up

  • Overall
  • Luis
  • Miami, Fl, United States
  • 10-31-09

Pretty Good

The book was pretty good but not bettr than the other 2 blockbusters by Dan Brown. I still would recommend it because it is good.

  • Overall

Knowledge

This book is packed with knowledge gleamed through ages past from the most compelling sources available on this planet. Unfortunately, the story developed to hold it all together is simply unbelievable.

  • Overall
  • Lisa
  • San Diego, CA, United States
  • 10-21-09

Not the best but by far not the worst

There are times when this book moves a bit more slowly and didactically than I liked, but it was still great escapist material. I enjoyed the ride through places in D.C. that I've visited, and it was a fun book overall.

I would not compare it to previous books, as this is hardly fair. On it's own, it is a good book with consistent characters that are painstakingly developed. The description was similar to seeing something in a movie, so I suspect this is going to be made into a film at some point. There are a few times when the description takes on more than it needs to, however.

Overall I would still recommend this book. Fun to listen to on the way to and from work and an interesting choice of subjects after the directions taken with "Angels and Demons" and "The Da Vinci Code."

  • Overall

The lost symbol

A great read. Audible is the best in books too.

  • Overall

so so!

Dan Brown does a nice job of creating a sense of being in the places he describes. I went to college in DC and the descriptions of places that I knew fairly well brought back a lot of memories. However, the story is fairly easy to figure out by about a third into the book. The reason for raising the events of the story to a national security threat was really a strain on credibility. There are a couple of nice twists, like the sensory deprivation tank,but overall it was fairly predictible. I enjoyed the story enough to stay with it until the end but it was certainly not his best work.

  • Overall

What a disappointment!

Save your time and money. The book stinks. Nothing at all like the DaVinci Code. It's preachy, long winded, and inane.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful