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Publisher's Summary

David Baldacci's remarkable detective Amos Decker - the man who can forget nothing - was first introduced in the sensational number-one New York Times best seller Memory Man. Now Decker returns in a stunning new novel....

The Fix

Amos Decker witnesses a murder just outside FBI headquarters. A man shoots a woman execution style on a crowded sidewalk, then turns the gun on himself.

Even with Decker's extraordinary powers of observation and deduction, the killing is baffling. Decker and his team can find absolutely no connection between the shooter - a family man with a successful consulting business - and his victim, a schoolteacher. Nor is there a hint of any possible motive for the attack.

Enter Harper Brown. An agent of the Defense Intelligence Agency, she orders Decker to back off the case. The murder is part of an open DIA investigation, one so classified that Decker and his team aren't cleared for it.

But they learn that the DIA believes solving the murder is now a matter of urgent national security. Critical information may have been leaked to a hostile government - or, worse, an international terrorist group - and an attack may be imminent.

Decker's never been one to follow the rules, especially with the stakes so high. Forced into an uneasy alliance with Agent Brown, Decker remains laser focused on only one goal: solving the case before it's too late.

©2017 David Baldacci (P)2017 Hachette Audio

Critic Reviews

"This fast-moving mystery is a wonderful vehicle for narrators Kyf Brewer and Orlagh Cassidy. Brewer portrays FBI agent Amos Decker's quirky personality and investigative abilities with aplomb. Cassidy provides wonderful, unique personalities for Defense Intelligence Agent Harper Brown and Decker's roommate and colleague Alex Jamison, as well as various other female characters.... Well-developed characters and realistic dialogue help listeners follow the story, and the well-paced, adept vocal performances add to the intrigue." ( AudioFile)

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What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    5,567
  • 4 Stars
    2,373
  • 3 Stars
    685
  • 2 Stars
    145
  • 1 Stars
    79

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    5,446
  • 4 Stars
    1,850
  • 3 Stars
    549
  • 2 Stars
    143
  • 1 Stars
    74

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4,924
  • 4 Stars
    2,141
  • 3 Stars
    725
  • 2 Stars
    163
  • 1 Stars
    82
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Good, but the narrorater effort is weak.

I like the story but didn't like the narroration on this book. did they change?

16 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Where is Ron Mcclarty?

New reader makes decker seem teenager. Bring back Ron Mcclarty for Pete's sake. He brought real meaning to the story. I don't feel that brewer brings the real Amos decker out

15 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Not the best Baldacci

I usually enjoy Baldacci, but this one was a struggle. The plot was good, but the characters were almost all unlikeable. I am also really tired of these narrators, especially the woman who only does southern, bitchy and immature, and sulky/weepy/whiny. Why are there so many sulky/weepy/whiny women in this novel? How many hours of sobbing women can anyone stand? Amos Decker is a jerk at least half the time and rarely likable.

22 of 24 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Stephen
  • WORCESTER, MA, United States
  • 04-23-17

How To Ruin A Guaranteed Best Seller

The only thing I have to say about this recording is that any Baldacci book is guaranteed to be a best seller, so why did Hachette pick poor readers to record the book. Orlagh Cassidy is Hachette regular, but I think she is highly over-rated as a reader. Kyf Brewer, in my opinion, totally misses the Amos Decker personality. He reads the book like a young adult novel.

The Baldacci story gets through, so if you are a fan, you can stick it out.

20 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Watered down & boring.

After the other books in the series (and by this author) I was looking forward to this one and had preordered it months in advance. I did listen to the entire book. I'm like that... once started, I have to finish a book; there have only been 2 or 3 books out of thousands that I've never finished. But it was finished a bit reluctantly. I was thinking I could be listening to something (almost anything) else.

The author (treats his audience as if we are all in kindergarten, completely over explaining every scene and situation. Almost as if it were an outline for a movie or tv show script (the actor notes, not an actual script). While not the most intellectual thrillers, I'd felt the previous books kept the reader in some suspense. This is so poorly written I doubt anyone will be left trying to guess what's going to happen. I found myself wondering more than once if this was really the same author. Not only was the plot terrible, extremely predictable and, yawn, boring (the same overdone plot of so many recent movies & tv shows -this one wasn't even well done), but we hardly get to see much of Amos. I mean, he is still the main character but we don't get much of what is special about this character. Where are the quirks, what efforts is he making to improve himself (or not), where is his pain we can empathize with? Oh, it's all "mentioned" but just barley. You get just the briefest of glimpses with no follow up.

The plot is so spread out and there are so many side characters and sub plots everything gets very watered down. If you are hoping for a delicious cup of rich espresso you'll only be getting a cup of stale, over heated drive through coffee. Blech!

17 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Horrible!

This was the worst book by baldacci I have ever read or listened to. I normally love his work but this was so contrived and convoluted I had to laugh at times due to the absurdity of the story.

If this was my first book by him, it would be my last.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

What a dissapointment

What disappointed you about The Fix?

The female voice was totally annoying and female characters are simpletons

What other book might you compare The Fix to and why?

None I want to read

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Too annoyed to continue

Any additional comments?

Did David Baldacci really write this?

10 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

The worst book by Baldacci that I have read

What disappointed you about The Fix?

The plot is not believable! Does anyone really think that terrorists could get into the utility tunnels beneath the Hoover Building from a construction site across the street? Probably could not have happened even before 9/11/2001; certainly could not happen since then.

What was most disappointing about David Baldacci’s story?

Much of the dialogue seemed as if the characters were talking to 5 year old children. I had difficulty believing that anyone read or edited the book before publication.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Kyf Brewer and Orlagh Cassidy ?

Almost anyone. George Guidall or Richard Ferrone.

Any additional comments?

This book does not belong on a "Best Seller" list. If it had not been written by Baldacci I doubt that it would have been published.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Horrible

Any additional comments?

I've read a lot of Baldacci but this is by far the worst. One absurd storyline that keeps getting rehashed and rehashed and characters keep repeating the same lines over and over.

And the dialogue is terrible and totally not believable.

And the women - oh my god, atrocious. Decker's FBI partner is a simpering, clueless idiot who spends half the book saying what do we do? What do we do now? Or asking him questions - do you think that means they did X? Or Y?

I love thrillers but this was painful reading/listening and as a woman, I was completely turned off.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

A stinker with no connection to reality.

What could David Baldacci have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Add some reality...maybe research how Federal agencies, cops, the military, and life in general actually works.

Any additional comments?

I am truly disappointed because I usually like everything from David Baldacci. Although never the author of deeply intellectual books, his trade mark flawed lead character and constant action still provide good stories. This thing however, despite the opinions of the obvious majority of others, was just painful for me. If you have no need for ANY contact with reality and believability, maybe this is a good book for you. But for me, the plot was unbearably disconnected from any basis in reality. The main character Detective Amos Decker, is an unlikable idiot savant presented as a genius that apparently intuits things based on nothing. He is a man trusted with a gun and a badge and placed on an FBI task force but that can't be trusted with a government car and has to have an FBI agent as a minder lest he offend everyone and wander off to God knows where. If this guy leaves a room in the middle of a conversation without saying anything to anyone once, he does it a hundred times and it makes my head feel like it will explode.
So here are just a few of the MANY MANY reasons I could not finish this book:
1) FBI does NOT investigate murder. Here, Decker is walking to the Hoover Building in DC (he doesn’t have a car) and sees an FBI “Contractor” walk up to a seemingly random woman, that turns out to be a substitute 8th grade teacher, and shoots her dead then himself, on the sidewalk near the entrance to the FBI building. The explanation of why that murder suicide is now an FBI investigation as opposed to “Local PD” is that it was “In front of FBI-HQ and the shooter was an FBI contractor/consultant. NOPE – NEVER. If it were IN the building, MAYBE. If the VICTIM was an FEDERAL EMPLOYEE and the murder was DIRECTLY RELATED to her employment, probably. Not because the sidewalk is close to their building and the shooter has a contract with them. And it would be a very short investigation by any agency as there is no mystery or a prosecution. It is merely a question of WHY and there might be a brief attempt to understand it and make sure there is no other person dead or involved somewhere… but there would be no “team of agents” swarming.
2) Decker is an Ohio Cop “on loan” to FBI but sent to Washington. NOT HAPPENING. Ohio (especially small municipal police departments) is not paying to protect Washington. Task forces team various Agencies to investigate and protect the area they represent. An NYPD/FBI task Force for example would be based in New York. NYPD has no ability (or money) to send a detachment of their cops to Washington.
3) Decker has “no car” and has to be chauffeured by others but he is on a Federal task force. He is sent from OHIO to DC (on an Ohio Cops salary) but no one issues him a car and he doesn’t have one in Ohio? ALL agents (and Task Force members) are issued cars. Likewise, Jamison his friend and roommate on the task force apparently isn’t issued a Bureau car as she is always driving her personal car on investigative work. This would be minor, except that it is a theme CONSTANTLY brought up: Jamison's car is too small for Decker, Decker has to walk, Decker complains about the task force's change of location because he has no car, etc. etc. etc.
4) Agent Harper of the DIA (Defense Intelligence Agency) tells Decker she used to be EOD in the Army. Decker doesn’t know what E.O.D. stands for (Explosives Ordinance Disposal [unit] or generically “the Bomb Squad”) which is something EVERY COP knows. On the other hand, when she tells him she is from the D.I.A., Harper is upset that Decker knows what the D.I.A. is. Defense Intelligence Agency IS NOT A COVERT SECRET ORGANIZATION. They have a website which pretty much ends that whole secret identity thing.
5) DIA is a FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE agency and part of DOD (Department of Defense). THEY CAN NOT operate on US soil or investigate American citizens. They ARE NOT law enforcement and cannot carry guns like the FBI. They DO NOT ARREST anyone. They Do Not tell the FBI what they can’t investigate whatever the FBI wants to investigate. The FBI IS the agency that investigates SPYING in this Country (Counter Espionage), NOT the DIA.
6) As a sub-plot, Decker and Jamison move into a building owned by a friend after the task force moves from FBI HQ to the Washington Field Office. In the building there is a Hispanic man living with his 11-year-old son. The man, a brick-layer by trade, is accosted by 2 thugs one morning and Decker intercedes, gun drawn and chases the well-dressed mafia types off. The brick layer refuses to say who they are or what the deal is and speeds off. A day later, Harper (remember DIA) and Decker are pulling up to Decker's building just as two goons are placing the bound and gagged brick layer into the trunk of their car. A gun battle ensues and Harper and Decker kill the 2 thugs. Still the brick layer refuses to tell them what was going on. On the third day, Jamison and Decker come home to find the 11-year old son of the brick layer at their door, upset his father has not come home. Jamison asks the boy if he is hungry and proceeds to make dinner (excellent prioritizing skills, even for the FBI) for him while Decker, alone, goes to the bricklayer’s construction site to see if he can find him(the previous two kidnap attempts apparently not prompting any thoughts of back up or a call to local police). Here he discovers that the mob guys have killed a bookkeeper and they kidnapped the brick layer so that he can dispose of the body by putting it in a HOLE and mixing a few bags of cement to pour in over top of the body. So... this guy is the only one smart enough to mix cement and apparently the authors have no clue that a CEMENT MASON and a Brick layer are two different trades. And, proving the FBI will never be accused of being cops or even thinking like cops, it never at any point apparently occurs to the agents to call the police. In fact, they choose not to because they might get the bricklayer and his son in trouble. WHAT? Really?
7) Decker has no security clearances but he is on a Federal Task Force. Everyone keeps telling him he isn’t privy to information because he has no clearance, …right before they tell him things that they claim are classified. Truth in point, The JANITOR at the FBI Academy has a dozen clearances in case he overhears something. No cop goes to a Homeland Security Task Force without clearances.
8) Decker, Harper and Jamison go into a storage shed rented by the murdered woman that they suspect is a spy or criminal and that is why Dabney killed her before killing himself. They get into the shed by scaring the rental clerk and lying to her. Once inside, they find and cut open a cardboard box, the only thing that is in the shed. They handle everything in it, no gloves, no photographs, no worry about explosives, or preserving evidence or for that matter, Russian poisons from the cold-war that could be in the box or on the contents. They find papers which they freely handle (fingerprints mean nothing) and examine a toy doll they suspect was used to conceal micro-fiche and micro dots back in the Cold-War Spy era (that leap of logic is a complete WTF all on its own). Decker proceeds to take the doll with him to restaurants where he sits openly at the table eating and handling evidence (spaghetti stains on evidence is always good for the career and helpful to investigators). He later takes that evidence home where he repeats the dinner table ritual. REALLY, even forgetting that it is evidence for a second… can you imagine finding an old doll in a ratty storage shed that has been God knows where for God knows how long, and handling it while eating. But more to the point, evidence gets BAGGED AND TAGGED then placed into EVIDENCE lockers at the FBI or Police Station. IT DOES NOT go to the investigators home.
9) And this is where I quit, the FBI goes to the original shooter's upscale very successful "consulting firm" where he "consults" for the FBI and other federal agencies, to find a soldier guarding the doors and refusing to allow the FBI agents entry. Harper walks up, now dressed in her Army Uniform instead of the apparently optional civilian attire of a DIA Agent. She is wearing her "side arm" and the DIA/Military have "shut down the business" and seized their records and assets. WHAT? Really? Again, the military is prohibited from operating on U.S. soil AND DIA is NOT law enforcement and therefore can seize precisely NOTHING.

OK, so that is a long list and truly it is just 9 of the MANY MANY crazy stupid things that just added up to unreadable. I truly do not think the authors even attempted to use reality or do research... or common sense.
As a bonus, Orlagh Cassidy is just like fingernails on a chalkboard for me. EVERY character she reads sounds like the character "Flo" from the 80's sitcom "Alice". A greasy spoon southern diner waitress on midnight shift. And every female character in this book is either ITCHY with a capital B or an annoying whiny pain which Cassidy can magnify in spades.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful