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Publisher's Summary

Where do we come from?

Where are we going?

The stunningly inventive new novel from the world's most popular thriller writer.

Bilbao, Spain

Robert Langdon, Harvard professor of symbology and religious iconology, arrives at the ultramodern Guggenheim Museum Bilbao to attend a major announcement - the unveiling of a discovery that "will change the face of science forever." The evening's host is Edmond Kirsch, a 40-year-old billionaire and futurist whose dazzling high-tech inventions and audacious predictions have made him a renowned global figure. Kirsch, who was one of Langdon's first students at Harvard two decades earlier, is about to reveal an astonishing breakthrough...one that will answer two of the fundamental questions of human existence.

As the event begins, Langdon and several hundred guests find themselves captivated by an utterly original presentation, which Langdon realizes will be far more controversial than he ever imagined. But the meticulously orchestrated evening suddenly erupts into chaos, and Kirsch's precious discovery teeters on the brink of being lost forever. Reeling and facing an imminent threat, Langdon is forced into a desperate bid to escape Bilbao. With him is Ambra Vidal, the elegant museum director who worked with Kirsch to stage the provocative event. Together they flee to Barcelona on a perilous quest to locate a cryptic password that will unlock Kirsch's secret.

Navigating the dark corridors of hidden history and extreme religion, Langdon and Vidal must evade a tormented enemy whose all-knowing power seems to emanate from Spain's Royal Palace itself...and who will stop at nothing to silence Edmond Kirsch. On a trail marked by modern art and enigmatic symbols, Langdon and Vidal uncover clues that ultimately bring them face to face with Kirsch's shocking discovery...and the breathtaking truth that has long eluded us.

Origin is Dan Brown's most brilliant and entertaining novel to date.

Dan Brown is the author of numerous number one international best sellers, including The Da Vinci Code, Inferno, The Lost Symbol, Angels & Demons, Deception Point, and Digital Fortress.

©2017 Dan Brown (P)2017 Random House Audio

What members say

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  • 4.4 out of 5.0
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Formulaic and (Sadly) Predictable but worth the read.

This was the first Dan Brown novel I chose to listen to on Audible. I typically like to read novels the old fashioned way, and listen to non-fiction on Audible.

When I first started reading Dan Brown novels, I loved that while his plots all seemed to follow the same formula and arc, they were rarely so predictable from the start. In almost every other DB book, I would find myself at a point where I’d feel glib for not seeing a plot twist coming.

That being said, this was an enjoyable book, and well-worth the Audible credit at 18+ hours.

It just wasn’t Dan Brown’s best effort, and I was really hoping for less exhausting over-explanation of details that don’t impact the plot. Dan Brown’s critics typically point to this as his biggest flaw, as if he’s trying to turn an 80 chapter book into one that’s over 100 like this one.

What I did love:

DB always does an amazing job creating imagery, especially when describing the setting and characters.

The narrator was FANTASTIC in my opinion. I really enjoyed listening to him read the book.

The theme of the plot. It was topical and very relevant to current societal issues.

All in all I give this novel:

3/5 Overall
5/5 Audiobook Performance

32 of 33 people found this review helpful

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my least favorite of his books

I have listened to all of Dan Brown's books...one was even on cassette! This one actually lost my attention several times. Usually these are great driving books due to the excitement, but this one was a bit too philosophical. It sometimes bound up the flow of the story and I had to relisten to sections because my mind had wondered. Definitely a Dan Brown book, but not his best.

39 of 41 people found this review helpful

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Formula over fiction

I remember when I read the DaVinci Code. I couldn't put it down. And when I did, it was 4am and I was half convinced a Spanish albino monk was going to come crashing through my window.

Maybe it isn't fair to compare the two, but this felt lazy by comparison. It's possible I'm immune at this point to the twists that Dan Brown takes the reader down, but I honestly don't think his heart was in the story. This felt more like an excruciatingly protracted science lesson than a mystery thriller.

I say this as a fan of Brown and as someone who will continue to read about Professor Langdon - regardless of the absurdity of his "romances" and leaps in logic - but this was the most disappointing "adventure" Langdon has embarked on. I honestly wanted to like it, but there were times in the story when I rolled my eyes so often, my wife thought that I was having stroke.

Return to Angels & Demons or DaVinci Code...even Inferno, but leave this on the shelf with the Lost Symbol.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

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You lost me in the last 3 hrs

So much excitement, then what should have the best part of the book turned into a scientific lecture. Now my head hurts and I don’t care when or how life started.

32 of 34 people found this review helpful

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Boring

The writing is uninspired, boring, and repetitive. The pace is very slow. The suspense feels contrived. The subplots are unimportant/uninteresting. I seriously considered returning the book midway through. But the promise of the big science discovery and the superb narrator kept me going. In the end, it was just ok, nothing ground breaking as promised. Surprisingly Brown cites real scientists and their ongoing preliminary research in the final presentation.

23 of 25 people found this review helpful

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Origin --UNORIGINAL

Dan Brown needs to find a new formula. Robert Langdon continues to chase around beautiful, historical cities with a beautiful woman. (really the same woman just with a different name & nationality in each book) The twists and denouement have become banal.
I anticipated the "surprise" revelations many chapters before the conclusion.

I have enjoyed Mr. Brown's previous books, but I forced myself to slog through this one.
Many pages ( or minutes ) of boring exposition.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Fell short

The whole story was just one predictable moment after another. I was less excited throughout this story then any other book by Dan. I do like his ability to bring past events and real historic site into the stories, it was great googling these locations as I was hearing about them in the story. The whole big reveal fell flat and was far too predictable.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Brown lost it

Dan Brown started writing for Hollywood long time ago, but with this book he appears to having run out of art.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Boring clichéd predictable

An needlessly long novel. Robert Langdon does his thing only twice and both are nothing compared to earlier works. Otherwise he is just along for the ride. The antagonist is needlessly fleshed out. It feels like the book is more about him than Langdon.
in this audio book it takes SIX hours to get going.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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Snoooooze

Paul Michael does a decent job with a dead fish of a story. The audio performance can't save this book though. I went in with no expectation of great literature, Dan Brown's past work has been clumsy but at least entertaining, but this ... this was painful.

Please may I never hear the phrase future queen of Spain again. It was a jab that this character had no purpose except to reflect back the ideas and motivations of the male characters. Gross.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful