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Publisher's Summary

It's 1942. Louise Pearlie, a young widow, has come to Washington DC to work as a clerk for the legendary OSS, the precursor to the CIA. When, while filing, she discovers a document concerning the husband of a college friend, Rachel Bloch - a young French Jewish woman she is desperately worried about - Louise realizes she may be able to help get Rachel out of Vichy France. But then a colleague whose help Louise has enlisted is murdered, and she realizes she is on her own, unable to trust anyone.

©2011 Sarah R. Shaber (P)2017 Sarah R. Shaber

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The audio version of a page-turner!

Louise, a North Carolina widow with blue collar origins, works for a government agency in a time when nobody can really talk much about his or her job. It was also a time when women could be invisible enough to suss out important information and make things happen - if they can live with the danger, the possible consequences if discovered, and no credit whatsoever.

When Louise tries to get her dearest friend out of Nazi occupied France, she uncovers far more than she could have imagined.
The character list is widely varied and multi-racial and cultural. Though there is a lot of sexism and separatism that was usual for the 1940s in the US, we also see a burgeoning feminism and racial tolerance that I found very heartening. Ms. Hoops did a fine job with all her characters. Every voice was distinctive.

I had a hard time putting it down (or turning it off).

1 of 1 people found this review helpful