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Publisher's Summary

When 007 goes to Harlem, it's not just for the jazz. This is the kingdom of Mr. Big, master of crime, voodoo baron, and partner in SMERSH's grim company of death. Those Mr. Big cannot possess he crushes - like his beautiful prisoner, Solitaire, and her would-be saviors James Bond and Agency man Felix Leiter. All three are marked out as victims in a trail of terror, treachery, and torture that leads from New York's underworld to the shark-infested island in the sun that Mr. Big calls his own.

This audiobook includes an exclusive bonus interview with Rory Kinnear.

Blackstone Audio, Inc. James Bond and 007 are registered trademarks of Danjaq LLC, used under license by Ian Fleming Publications Ltd

©1954 Ian Fleming (P)2014 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

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  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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  • Will
  • Brandy Station, VA, United States
  • 10-26-16

Far From Racist

I have to say I disagree with the reviews they call this book racist. The book was written in 1954. The language it uses it typical of that time. rather than being racist, this book is actually very Pro African American, as its antagonist is a brilliant, powerful man whose organization proves more capable than the combined resources of the FBI, CIA and MI6. All this in a book that was written while Jim Crow laws were still in effect. Rather than being reviled as racist, this book should be recognized as an early piece of civil rights literature.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Live and Let Die

As the rest of the Bond books, Live and Let Die takes you to the scene where you can picture all the events happening. I always hate when the books end because the are that good.

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The Real James Bond Returns

If your only experience with this title is through the Roger Moore film, then this will be a refreshing change. This is James Bond at his most realistic, without the puns, innuendos, and humorous asides to anyone listening. (Don't get me wrong - I love the films, but these novels are the real deal from which all those ideas sprang.) Here is an, admittedly, dated spy novel with some great elements. If you enjoyed the films you will see plot points that show up in several different films that you probably did not realized originated here. If you enjoy spy novels in general this is a good one.

I should state that when I mentioned that it was dated, it primarily relates to issues relating to black characters. Terminology is of-it's-time referring to them simply as negroes and it makes some very broad racial characterizations that were thought of as accurate back in the day when this was written. I do not get the sense that Ian Fleming was racist in any way. He simply wrote what to the current beliefs and societal views were at that time. Take that into account if you are sensitive to these matters. The novel is approximately 60+ years old.

Bottom line: If you like spy novels in general or James Bond in any form, you owe it to yourself to see how they all began and read Flemings works. This is the second of the series but stands pretty well on it's own. There are a couple minor references to Casino Royale but that is not required reading to enjoy this novel.

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Bond, James Bond

Ian Fleming really has a flare and it is easy to see why they became hit movies when starring the one and only Sean Connery. I enjoy
that Bond is more human sensitive and relies Less on gadgetry. Awkward that people are referred to by their skin color. For example, "the Negro brought the beer to the table" Etc.

  • Overall

Great Book

Love Bond. I could see scenes from several of the movies in this book......in all of them really. I don't understand how people expect "all" books to be written like they are today, with all the political correctness. It was the '50s', so expect 50's writing. I don't think this book was racist at all and agree with the review before mine.....pro not negative. Interesting to see how the English saw us Americans, period. Great book, good reading.

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another hit

great performance and kept me interested all the way through. listened to it multiple times

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Different from the film but interesting

Written in 1954, this has all the colonial racism, sexism, and British exceptionalism one should expect from a Bond novel but as a pulp adventure story it is quite enjoyable.

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well worth reading

It would have to be stupendous for me to give this 5 stars, and perhaps 4 is a stretch, but there were portions that were quite good (the flight to Jamaica being perhaps the best, and Solitare of course is literally to die for). Overall I am quite delighted to have invested the time.

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Much better than that awful Roger Moore movie.

Voodoo. Americans. Sharks. Gold. Harlem. Mr. Big. Jamaica.

Loved every minute of it. One more bond book under my belt.

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great!

even more action than watching it..
and just as sexy. I would recommend this book to get a real feel of James Bond.