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Publisher's Summary

Peeps takes movie reviewing to new heights of viciousness. On this prime-time TV show, two caustic critics look at the hits and misses among the new movies, trading wits, insults - even punches.

But even a series with high riatings like Peeps can stare at cancellation - not by the networks, but by murder. Because Dunphy has just been found with a knife in his back in the dressing room of Tobin, his co-host and sparring partner. The cops' script says Tobin - who'd secretly shared the affections of Dunphy's wife and brawled on air with Dunphy the night before - has the motivation for the part of star suspect. But for Tobin, the accusation is hardly entertaining, and he sets out to find the real killer in the cast.

About the author: Ed Gorman is an award-winning American author best known for his crime and mystery fiction. He wrote The Poker Club which is now a film of the same name directed by Tim McCann.

He has written under many pseudonyms including E. J. Gorman and Daniel Ransom. He won a Spur Award for Best Short Fiction for his short story "The Face" in 1992. His fiction collection Cages was nominated for the 1995 Bram Stoker Award for Best Fiction Collection. His collection The Dark Fantastic was nominated for the same award in 2001.

©1987 Edward J. Gorman (P)2013 David Wilson

Critic Reviews

"If Ed Gorman's name doesn't eventulaly become as famous as that of Lawrence Sanders, it's an unjust world. His work is fresh, polished, excitingly paced, thoroughly entertaining - and has something to say about the way we live, the way we are, and what we wish we were." (Dean Koontz)

What listeners say about Murder on the Aisle

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    4 out of 5 stars

Greed, murder and betrayal

Greed, murder, and betrayal are the perfect ingredients for a mystery tale. Dean Sluyter did a good job narrating. I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

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Good Narration

Toby and Dunphy live critic, that did they sparring at one another behind doors and didn’t look like they would be signing the next contract. A noise and .Toby answers the door, Murder of his partner has happen. With the holidays, police think it’s an open and shut case, Given audio which I enjoyed and added to the story, like the plot, and what was behind killing him. Given audio for my voluntary review.

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  • col2910
  • 09-15-20

Bang average

Another day another audible book and one mostly enjoyed while at work. Ed Gorman is an author I've been meaning to try for a while and this was my first outing with him. In truth it was okay and from a few comments on a tangential post on Twitter concerning Gorman, apparently it is not one of his better works. It didn't blow me away that's for sure. A radio host turns detective when his co-star is murdered and he's the likeliest suspect; having previously been having an affair with the deceased's wife and having had a major bust up in public with the man. Murder, an amateur investigation, a variety of suspects each with possible motivation for the crime, some sexual shenanigans, an outcome. Nothing especially memorable or outstanding in the book. I'm a bit undecided as to whether I liked the main character or not. There's nothing in his character or actions that invoked strong feelings either way. Similarly, I was interested in the story and the investigation and the revelation of the guilty party, but I wasn't on the edge of my seat. It was a book which was enjoyed upto a point. It's the kind of book that fills in a gap before I either encounter my next amazing or really terrible read. I did like the look into the world of television and broadcasting...... envy, ratings, networking, the career ladder. The pace was okay and the book wasn't over-long but neither did it feel rushed. 3 from 5 Ed Gorman did pen a second book with Tobin the main character, but it's probably not one I'll seek out. There are plenty of other books from him with more appeal. Read - (listened to) August, 2020 Published - 1987 Page count - 160 (5hrs) Source - Audible purchase Format - Audible

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  • Victoria Schwimley
  • 01-26-20

A whodunit.

This is a difficult review to write, but I’ll focus on the things I liked. The narrator has a pleasant voice and the production copy is nice and clear. The story seemed to have an okay storyline, and the main character had some wit, which I like in these types of mysteries. I listened to the book twice, thinking perhaps something distracted me while I was listening to it. However, after the second listen, I still wasn’t sure who was the guilty person. I knew the name, but I don’t remember where in the story he/she fits in. I finally realized it was because I was having difficulty following who the characters were. I don’t know whether this was the story flow or the narrator. Despite this, I did enjoy it. I could go back a third time, noting the guilty person’s name and look for it in the story, but I don’t think I’ll do that. The guilty party became known along with the motive, and I guess that’s what counts in a story.