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Publisher's Summary

In the bar-parlor of the Angler’s Rest, Mr. Mulliner tells his amazing tales, holding the assembled company of Pints of Stout and Whiskies and Splash in the palm of his expressive hand. Here you can discover what happened to the man who gave up smoking, share a frisson when the butler delivers something squishy on a silver salver (“Your serpent, Sir,” said the voice of Simmons) - and experience the dreadful unpleasantness at Bludleigh Court. Throughout, the Mulliner clan remains resourcefully in command in the most outlandish situations.

Public Domain (P)2012 AudioGo

What listeners say about Mr. Mulliner Speaking

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Avoid This One

I love Wodehouse but I guess even he could merely "phone it in" when he needed to. Perhaps there was a contractual obligation to crank a book out when the author didn't feel like writing one? I did not get past the first few chapters. Mulliner has all the Wodehousian language elements but no soul. Jonathan Cecil's excellent narration isn't enough to save it. Pass on by.

8 people found this helpful

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Jonathan Cecil & P.G. Wodehouse - Superb!

Nobody brings Wodehouse to life as Jonathan Cecil does. The subtle punches and not so subtle descriptions by Wodehouse are superbly expressed.

2 people found this helpful

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Delightful

So refreshingly delightful I so enjoyed the sense of humor plus a turn of phrase.

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Wonderful!

When I realized this was short stories I was initially disappointed. However, I ended up absolutely loving this book! The narration was faultless. And I was quite tickled to see Bobbie Wickham appear, and to find out that Bertie is not the only man to have fallen briefly under her spell. Great book!

1 person found this helpful

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Deeper satire on about 6 subjects

I listened straight through but would have done better with 1-2 of the 9 chapters at a time. Without need to sustain a complex plot, PGW densifies the satire. As barroom stories, the need for credibility is relaxed. Knowing just a bit about each story allows for a bit of mental preparation.
Chapter 1 hits on 2 tropes, proposing marriage based on instant infatuation and manipulating first impressions. 2 hits on the risk of smoking cessation. 3 (and parts of others) cover(s) how far a man may go to maintain fashion standards. 4 is not unique, a struggle between love and cowardice. 5 Reminds me of how the Emsworth nobility in Blandings castle responded to the temptation of handling an air gun. 6 rehashes the idea of playing a golf game to decide who wins a woman. 7-9 characterise Bobble Wickham and the tribulations of those who fall for her.

If there’s a single moral to the book it may be that it’s better to drink beer in an English pub listening to stories than to expend the effort required to be idly rich.