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Monday Starts on Saturday

Narrated by: Ramiz Monsef
Length: 8 hrs and 56 mins
Categories: Fiction, Humor
4.5 out of 5 stars (36 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Sasha, a young computer programmer from Leningrad, is driving north to meet some friends for a nature vacation. He picks up a couple of hitchhikers who persuade him to take a job at the National Institute for the Technology of Witchcraft and Thaumaturgy.

The adventures Sasha has in the largely dysfunctional institute involve all sorts of magical beings - a wish-granting fish, a tree mermaid, a cat who can remember only the beginnings of stories, a dream-interpreting sofa, a motorcycle that can zoom into the imagined future, a lazy dog-sized mosquito - along with a variety of wizards (including Merlin), vampires, and officers.

First published in Russia in 1965, Monday Starts on Saturday has become the most popular Strugatsky novel in their homeland. Like the works of Gogol and Kafka, it tackles the nature of institutions - here focusing on one devoted to discovering and perfecting human happiness. By turns wildly imaginative, hilarious, and disturbing, Monday Starts on Saturday is a comic masterpiece by two of the world's greatest science-fiction writers.

©2017 Boris Strugatsky and Arkady Strugatsky (P)2017 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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Maybe I should have read this one.

I dunno. A guy goes to a science lab that's full of living folk tale characters and magic shit. The synopsis sounded way better. At the end I shrugged. Open to the idea that I've missed something. Hoping for insight into the soviet mindset via their fiction. But this one was kinda boring and nonlinear. And at the end I got the impression everyday soviets thought their government was sort of mismanaged but nothing I could grab onto for conversation's sake. I admit maybe if I read it it I would have digested more. Shrug.

1 of 5 people found this review helpful