• Mississippi in Africa

  • The Saga of the Slaves of Prospect Hill Plantation and Their Legacy in Liberia Today
  • By: Alan Huffman
  • Narrated by: Andrew L. Barnes
  • Length: 13 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History, Africa
  • 3.8 out of 5 stars (30 ratings)
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Publisher's Summary

The gripping story of 200 freed Mississippi slaves who sailed to Liberia to build a new colony - where the colonists' repression of the native tribes would beget a tragic cycle of violence.

When a wealthy Mississippi cotton planter named Isaac Ross died in 1836, his will decreed that his plantation, Prospect Hill, should be liquidated and the proceeds from the sale be used to pay for his slaves' passage to the newly established colony of Liberia in western Africa. Ross' heirs contested the will for more than a decade in the state courts and legislature - prompting a deadly revolt in which a group of slaves burned Ross' mansion to the ground - but the will was ultimately upheld. The slaves then emigrated to their new home, where they battled the local tribes and built vast plantations with Greek Revival mansions in a region the Americo-Africans renamed "Mississippi in Africa." The seeds of resentment sown over a century of cultural conflict between the colonists and tribal peoples would explode in the late 20th century, begetting a civil war that rages in Liberia to this day.

In the award-winning tradition of Slaves in the Family, this enthralling work traces an epic legacy that sweeps from the slave quarters of the antebellum South to the war-ravaged streets of modern-day Monrovia. Tracking down Prospect Hill's living descendants, deciphering a history ruled by rumor, and delivering the complete chronicle in riveting prose, journalist Alan Huffman has rescued a lost chapter of American history whose aftermath is far from over.

©2004 Alan Huffman (P)2014 Redwood Audiobooks

Critic Reviews

"A great story. In the journey from Mississippi to Liberia, Huffman has uncovered a fascinating tale that's spent too long in obscurity." ( San Francisco Chronicle, Best Books of 2004)
"Alan Huffman is a brilliant storyteller who pulls off a difficult story with breathtaking skill, taking us from the antebellum South to war-torn Liberia. An absolute pleasure to read." (Sebastian Junger, author of The Perfect Storm)
"A superior historical and journalistic investigation, tracing the lives and legacies of freed slaves in America and Africa... Thought-provoking and expertly told." ( Kirkus Reviews)

What listeners say about Mississippi in Africa

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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Great listen!!!!

It exceeded my expectations. I loved it. Mississippi in Africa gave my a knew perspective on the Africa / United States relationship.

3 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Narration is a little weak, but good book

The story and the book are great, but the narrator doesn't seems to lack understanding of the African continent, cities, and the librarian dialect. He mispronounced several places: (Conakra instead of Conakry --- pronounced "Conakrih", and Burkina, instead of just Burkina-Fasso (there is no country called Burkina or Fasso, it's one name). He also doesn't used the Liberian dialect which most readers wouldn't be aware off but as someone from that part of the world, it was hard to follow that part of the book.

Otherwise, it's a great book with an interesting story. The narrator did well at the beginning of the book, but fell a little short when dealing with the African continent.

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interesting but disjointed

while the entire story is interesting, halfway through the author leaves the original Prospect hill part of the story completely behind and gets into modern Liberian history. He never really ties the two together leaving the original story unresolved. Regardless, this is a very important part of North American and African history that more people should hear about.

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Sinoe County...the "i" is pronounced like "eye".

Grated my ears like nails on a chalkboard every time I heard it mispronounced. Spoiled the narrative. Inexcusable since the book is about the folks who emigrated to Sinoe.