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Publisher's Summary

Joining the ranks of the classics Please Kill Me, Our Band Could Be Your Life, and Can't Stop Won't Stop, an intriguing oral history of the post-9/11 decline of the old-guard music industry and rebirth of the New York rock scene, led by a group of iconoclastic rock bands.

In the second half of the 20th century New York was the source of new sounds, including the Greenwich Village folk scene, punk and new wave, and hip-hop. But as the end of the millennium neared, cutting-edge bands began emerging from Seattle, Austin, and London, pushing New York further from the epicenter. The behemoth music industry, too, found itself in free fall, under siege from technology. Then 9/11/2001 plunged the country into a state of uncertainty and war - and a dozen New York City bands that had been honing their sound and style in relative obscurity suddenly became symbols of glamour for a young, web-savvy, forward-looking generation in need of an anthem.

Meet Me in the Bathroom charts the transformation of the New York music scene in the first decade of the 2000s, the bands behind it - including The Strokes, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, LCD Soundsystem, Interpol, and Vampire Weekend - and the cultural forces that shaped it, from the Internet to a booming real estate market that forced artists out of the Lower East Side to Williamsburg. Drawing on 200 original interviews with James Murphy, Julian Casablancas, Karen O, Ezra Koenig, and many other musicians, artists, journalists, bloggers, photographers, managers, music executives, groupies, models, movie stars, and DJs who lived through this explosive time, journalist Lizzy Goodman offers a fascinating portrait of a time and a place that gave birth to a new era in modern rock and roll.

©2017 Elizabeth Goodman (P)2017 HarperCollins Publishers

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Rates with the best rock bios.

Found myself pausing this read quite often to look up songs on Spotify. As much as I enjoy the oral history part of this book, it's Goodman's analysis of the music and the environs it sprang from that I appreciate most. Will most likely listen to this one again, and soon.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Best music book I've ever read.

Couldn't put it down. I learned more about the origins of one of the most important 10yrs in recent music history than any other resource I've ever seen. Immediately joins the pantheon of must-read music books.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Dispute the insulting representation of female voices!

Whoever produced this audio book should be fined for being sexist. Why should the women voices all be spoken with the inflection of profound snotty attitude and overt sexuality. The male voice was fine.
I literally can’t recommend this book to friends because of the choice of the woman narrator.
The content is superb.

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Greater then the sum of its parts

This was an interesting book.

It is almost entirely composed of quotes, assembled together into narrative form like a huge jigsaw puzzle. At first it felt tedious, especially since the name of the person quoted is stated before each quote. This literallly happens thousands of times in this 19 hour audiobook. When I started I thought that I reallu wouldn't be able to stand it, but after a while you start getting used to it. In retrospect I am really amazed at the amount of work it must of taken in order to turn an infinite amount of jigsaw pieces into a very cohesive narrative. This alone makes it an impressive achievement.

However the very nature of this book makes it void of objectivity. Its put together by interviewing hundreds of people who were very impressed with their own glory days, and as such it seems to attribute a lot more significance to this scene then it really deserved. If an alien was to land on Earth and pick up this book to learn about modern music, they would get the impression that The Strokes were the most significant cultural entity in the universe.

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Waste of time

Disappointing. Felt more like a brag story than a tale about the scene. Just listen to the bands instead of this book.

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Amazing one of the best books I’ve read in a long time.

The stories in this book take make to an era of my life. I didn’t realize the significance of all these bands I was listening to in college. It’s crazy to think about where these bands are now; gone, mainstream, sober, still high, broken up or dead. It’s a trip down memory lane and it continues as you revisit all these incredible bands you may have forgot about in this era of digital music at your finger tips.

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Just a bunch of anecdotes,

There was no narrative. It is just a giant collection of quotes and anecdotes about people, bands, etc. I was expecting a historical/sociological book and got only reminiscences from a bunch of people about how great a bunch of other people were. I tried, but it becomes very tedious. It is like being at a party listening to people talk about their friends who you don't really know. I knew most if the bands but it just seemed too insider. Returned for a refund.

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Great book, half the narration is great. But...

Love the storytelling and the structure of the chapters. Interesting read for any rock fans or NYC lovers.

One warning: the female narrator actress is awful. The interview subjects speaking about incredibly serious, thesis-level stuff relating to the story. But this woman narrator can’t help but giggle and over-act the written page.

Male narrator is great, affecting different voices for the various subjects with great success. Never hire this woman again, Audible.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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NYC might be dead but the stories arent

Great stories if you were into this era and music. loved the format of quote style story telling reminiscent of 'Please Kill Me'.

so much hot juicy gossip too...

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Must read for indie music fans

Great stories and perspectives from The Strokes, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Kings of Leon, The Killers during their heydey. Only thing that took some getting used to in the audiobook is the name being read before every quote. It’s also a lot of names to keep track of if you don’t know every artist/producer by name.