• Mayday 1971

  • A White House at War, a Revolt in the Streets, and the Untold History of America's Biggest Mass Arrest
  • By: Lawrence Roberts
  • Narrated by: Kiff VandenHeuvel
  • Length: 15 hrs and 42 mins
  • 4.3 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Mayday 1971  By  cover art

Mayday 1971

By: Lawrence Roberts
Narrated by: Kiff VandenHeuvel
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $31.49

Buy for $31.49

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

A vivid account of the largest act of civil disobedience in US history, in Richard Nixon’s Washington

They surged into Washington by the tens of thousands in the spring of 1971. Fiery radicals, flower children, and militant vets gathered for the most audacious act in a years-long movement to end America’s war in Vietnam: a blockade of the nation’s capital. And the White House, headed by an increasingly paranoid Richard Nixon, was determined to stop it.

Washington journalist Lawrence Roberts, drawing on dozens of interviews, unexplored archives, and newfound White House transcripts, re-creates these largely forgotten events through the eyes of dueling characters. Woven into the story too are now-familiar names including John Kerry, Jane Fonda, and Daniel Ellsberg, leaker of the Pentagon Papers. It began with a bombing inside the US Capitol - a still-unsolved case to which Roberts brings new information. To prevent the Mayday Tribe’s guerrilla-style traffic blockade, the government mustered the military. Riot squads swept through the city, arresting more than 12,000 people. As a young female public defender led a thrilling legal battle to free the detainees, Nixon and his men took their first steps down the road to the Watergate scandal and the implosion of the presidency.

Mayday 1971 is the ultimately inspiring story of a season when our democracy faced grave danger, and survived.

©2020 Lawrence Roberts (P)2020 HarperCollins Publishers
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about Mayday 1971

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Liberty requires constant vigilance

This book is the best narrative of the anti-war movement during the Viet Nam war era. Thoroughly researched and well-written, Lawrence Roberts deserves a Pulitzer Prize for this journalistic tour de force.

Based on Aaron Sorkin’s successful production of an acclaimed feature film about the trial of the Chicago Seven, it occurred to me that Mayday 1971 would make a great miniseries. Not only is there an aging Boomer audience, but the Trump era has reawakened fears of neofascism and younger generations need to understand how fragile democracy is and what is required to protect it.

I know. I was there. And I was arrested, along with three other medical school classmates while walking down the sidewalk away from DuPont Circle with backpacks with red crosses on them. We were jailed with falsified arrest documents. Roberts’ account of the mass incarceration of some 15,000 almost entirely peaceful demonstrators is chilling and serves as a warning: it CAN happen here —and it did.
Buy this book and after you read it (or listen to it), send copies to Aaron Sorkin and Ken Burns.

1 person found this helpful