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Lord Dunsany's Tales of Wonder

Stories from a Magical World
Narrated by: Erik Yount
Length: 4 hrs and 5 mins
Categories: Fiction, Literary
4 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

No wonder art and music have held such a deep and abiding fascination for us, regardless of our economic station in life. As Nietzsche opined, "Without music, life would be a mistake". To which I would add literature, sport, or any diversion that provides us with a moment of unexpected bliss.

We have been engaged far too long in moments of pain and suffering, and anything that can offer us a glimpse of solace, of hope, of entertainment, is to be welcomed with open arms and open hearts. It is for this very reason that I am happy to announce that the MSAC Philosophy Group has decided to republish Lord Dunsany's remarkable book Tales of Wonder, which, in this edition, has the newly added subtitle, Stories from a Magical World.

Lord Dunsany was Edward Plunkett's pen name, and he was a very successful author of numerous books, plays, and short stories. He possessed a remarkable imagination and created fantastical landscapes peopled with unique characters. To listen to his short stories is to be transported to another time and to another place and, in the midst of it all, to be enthralled by the marvel of it all. His creative method perhaps gives us a glimpse into this unusual man: Dunsany's writing habits were considered peculiar by some. Lady Beatrice said that "he always sat on a crumpled old hat while composing his tales". (The hat was eventually stolen by a visitor to Dunsany Castle.) Dunsany almost never rewrote anything; everything he ever published was a first draft. Much of his work was penned with quill pens, which he made himself; Lady Beatrice was usually the first to see the writings and would help type them. It has been said that Lord Dunsany would sometimes conceive stories while hunting and would return to the castle and draw in his family and servants to reenact his visions before he set them on paper.

It is our hope that this new edition will serve as an introduction for new listeners to enjoy the timeless stories of Lord Dunsany.

©2016 MSAC Philosophy Group (P)2017 MSAC Philosophy Group

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a great stories with not so great naration

it's weird one. On one hand, it's one of the very few long book from Dunsany I could find. I came here looking for more stories along the lines of lovecraft's dream cycle, and I got my fix.
But the narration has problem. The narrator's tone and pace makes scene blend together in a distant and monotone fashion.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Not to be mean...

Putting it plainly, Dunsany's stories normally evoke a sense of nostalgic intrigue, but the reader's performance here separates the listener from easily rekindling that inner flame of childish wonder. The listener has to work to be immersed in the stories.
I'm sure David is a great person inside. Unfortunately, he's not a great narrator on the outside.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Richard Johnston
  • Richard Johnston
  • 07-13-19

Disappointing

Dunsany wrote many wonderful and magical tales but this book doesn’t measure up to his best. First, it is not correctly titled. It is not “Tales of Wonder” but a later volume called “Late Tales of Wonder” which is inferior to the earlier volume. Many of the tales here are wandering, pointless and lacking in the magical ambiance of which Dunsany was capable.

Secondly, the narration did not help. I found it robotic. There was little sense of emotional involvement in the stories. In the preface the narrator mispronounces the author’s title. “Dunsany” should have the emphasis put on the second syllable which has a long “a”. The river “Thames” was also mispronounced. But these errors, irritating though they were, were eclipsed by the droning narration which sounded so artificial.

I love Dunsany’s works and hope that a volume is eventually issued which gives a better sample of his stories read more proficiently.