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Publisher's Summary

High heroic adventure from New York Times best-selling author Elizabeth Moon, author of The Deed of Paksenarrion

Although the king's illegitimate son had promised he would never seek the throne, he breaks his oath and gets himself into so much trouble that his only hope lies in rescue by the greatest Paladin...who won't be born for another 500 years.

©2017 Blackstone Audio, Inc. (P)2017 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Slow

It was perhaps the slowest of the Paksanarian books. And she was barely in it, despite what the book description says.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

A great pick for readers familiar with the series

Liar's Oath is a good read if you are familiar with Moon's Paksenarrion series, especially the latter books that focus on Duke Phelan and the reemergence of magery in Fintha. A direct sequel to Surrender None, the story of Gird. However, Liar's Oath has a very different narrative style - it is more slippery and morally gray, reflecting the main character Luap's differences from Gird. I gasped at moments of subtle betrayal and the unmaking of trust and promises. The story occasionally dawdles and rushes, but there is a compelling tale here. I also enjoyed James Patrick Cronin's narration, which had character without being melodramatic.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful