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Publisher's Summary

The Prince, written by Niccolò Machiavelli in 1513 and published in 1532 posthumously, is one of the most controversial pieces of writing in the world, even from the moment it was presented to “The Magnificent Lorenzo di Piero de'Medici”. Machiavelli was already considered a controversial figure in his time, and this fact, along with his imprisonment, torture, and banishment by the newly reinstated Medici regime, is the most likely reason for its rejection by its intended recipient. It is written like a letter of advice to the new prince from someone who understands through experience and wisdom how to maintain a “principality”. 

This treatise is credited with the coining of the term “Machiavellian”. Generally, this is a negative term referring to corrupt and “evil” politicians, who will use immoral behavior, such as lying, stealing, and even murder, to get what they want. If this turns out to be good for the many, they take credit for it as having done something bad in order to make something good happen. This “ends justify the means” philosophy is thought to have been started by Machiavelli, although this exact phrasing is not used in his writing and his actual meaning is typically taken out of context. However, the basic idea behind the ends justifying the means theory is evident. Despite the controversy surrounding the title, The Prince is thought to be the most popular political book in history. It is still read to this day and many find useful leadership lessons from Machiavelli. While most scholars and philosophers think Machiavelli was advocating evil and cruelty, others such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Denis Diderot found that modern democratic politics were inspired by Machiavelli's writings. 

Machiavelli spends much time in The Prince discussing principalities: how a prince comes to rule over one, how to maintain it, and giving examples of other rulers who either failed or succeeded in maintaining their princedoms once obtaining them.

©2018 Matt Harrison (P)2018 Matt Harrison

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A guide to be Machiavellian.

This is a short introduction to a famous work that had an impact on future thinkers.

The Narrator is good but the Audio quality is not of a high standard.

Anyone who wants a quick overview to this highly influential thinker will
appreciate this book.



This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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Nuanced applications of an often misinterpreted figure

This was a really balanced perspective on the most hated and often misrepresented figure in political theory.

Check this audiobook out if you had a hard time gleaning helpful applications from this classic text for your modern business context.

The content was organized in a really helpful way and brilliantly presented.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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The End Justifies the Means

Machiavelli's work is known for using evil as a means of running or leading. However, this book brings to light that Machiavelli's views could be applied in businesses in a more positive way. Throughout my adult life I have heard that "sometimes it's better to rule by fear" or, "the end justifies the means." I had no idea where these quotes until listening to this book.

The narrator did a very good job with narrating this book.

I requested this free review copy and have chosen to leave a review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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It's a dirty job

...but if you want to rule, you'll have to do it. This collection of writings by Machiavelli are instructions on how to rule benevolently when possible and ruthlessly if necessary. The modern reference to something being MACHIAVELLIAN denotes behaviors that are considered ruthless and manipulative, but much of the book talks of what is best for the people and how to have a prosperous society without an overburdening of taxes. But above all is the underlying theme of staying in powere once it has been attained.

I was given this audio recording for free at my request in exchange for this unbiased review.

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  • TU
  • 06-11-18

A short but interesting listen

I was given this free review copy audio book at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

I initially requested this book out of curiosity. I was familiar with the term "Machiavellian" but had little knowledge beyond the notion of ends justify the means, I didn't know what to expect from this book. I found the book to be interesting and well put together. The narration was pretty good, too. If you are looking for a high level overview of Machiavelli's take on leadership, this would be a good place to start.

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Descent Summary and Application

I listened to Matt Harrison's take on 'The Art of War' and found it insightful and interesting. His work on 'The Prince' is a similarly well worked out summary and application of Machiavelli's principles. I didn't find it to be as interesting or applicable as 'The Art of War', possibly owing to structure of 'The Prince', but it wasn't a bad work at all. Nate Sjol again narrates and does an excellent job.



I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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Great quick read

Leadership Lessons from Niccolo Machiavelli and The Prince by Matt Harrison was a great quick read. This book explained how The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli can make you a better leader.

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Machiavellian<br /><br />

a very good info book that was written quite well the narrator did a great job and it is a well-defined 30 minutes of great information
I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

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Intresting and to the point.

This is not The Prince by Machiavelli. This is a guide by Matt Harrison to the insight of The Prince and how one can apply its wisdom in business, politics, and other forms of leadership. I would recommend this to anyone who has considered reading Machiavelli as an introduction.
Narrator was clear and easy to understand.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.