• Last Mission to Tokyo

  • The Extraordinary Story of the Doolittle Raiders and Their Final Fight for Justice
  • By: Michel Paradis
  • Narrated by: Jacques Roy
  • Length: 12 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History, Military
  • 4.3 out of 5 stars (84 ratings)
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $21.35

Buy for $21.35

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Michel Paradis’ Last Mission to Tokyo, a “superb” (The Wall Street Journal) and “engrossing...richly researched” (The New York Times Book Review) account of a key but underreported moment in World War II: The Doolittle Raids and the international war crimes trial in 1945 that defined the Japanese American relations and changed legal history.

In 1942, freshly humiliated from the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States was in search of a plan. President Roosevelt, determined to show the world that our nation would not be intimidated or defeated by enemy powers, demanded recommendations for a show of strength. Jimmy Doolittle, a stunt pilot with a doctorate from MIT, came forward and led 80 young men, gathered together from the far-flung corners of Depression-era America, on a seemingly impossible mission across the Pacific. Sixteen planes in all, they only had enough fuel for a one-way trip. Together, the Raiders, as they were called, did what no one had successfully done for more than a thousand years. They struck the mainland of Japan and permanently turned the tide of the war in the Pacific.

Almost immediately, The Doolittle Raid captured the public imagination, and has remained a seminal moment in World War II history, but the heroism and bravery of the mission is only half the story. In Last Mission to Tokyo, Michel Paradis reveals the dramatic aftermath of the mission, which involved two lost crews captured, tried, and tortured at the hands of the Japanese, a dramatic rescue of the survivors in the last weeks of World War II, and an international manhunt and trial led by two dynamic and opposing young lawyers - in which both the United States and Japan accused the other of war crimes - that would change the face of our legal and military history. Perfect for fans of Lucky 666 and Nuremberg: Infamy on Trial, Last Mission to Tokyo is an unforgettable war story-meets-courtroom-drama that “captures the reader with the first sentence and never lets go” (John Grisham).

©2020 Michel Paradis (P)2020 Simon & Schuster, Inc.

More from the same

What listeners say about Last Mission to Tokyo

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    51
  • 4 Stars
    19
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    4
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    48
  • 4 Stars
    17
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    47
  • 4 Stars
    16
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    3

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

terrific book, excellently rendered to audio

This is a terrific story, that expands on a small sliver of [mostly distorted] history within the broader story of the Doolittle Raid. It provides a different interpretation, convincingly, than I had been taught -- the one I had emphasized the "littleness" of the damage & suggested the Japanese were able to shrug the whole thing off. The author demonstrates that the raid was instrumental in the subsequent [disasterous for Japan] Midway expedition, and that the raid resulted in the intensification of rivalries within the Japanese cabinet. The author also shows how the foregoing, combined with the collateral/civilian damage from the raid (firmly denied by the Doolittle raid participants) led to the events of the imprisonment, torture, executions of the captured raiders. The author also provides an object lesson about how hard it is to achieve a truthful & fair war crimes trial, something that applies to the trial of the Japanese in Shanghai & to the Al Quaida in America's 100-year old Cuban colony in Guantanamo. Highly recommended.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

riveting

Japan is a secondary when it comes to WWII. We think of Germany, Hitler, and the Holocaust.
Author worked hard at showing us a side of the war that we do not normally see.
The story of the POWs that came home from Japan is astounding.
Descriptions of the beheadings is very vivid.
Great book

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Bait and switch

I was drawn to the book by the topic, reviews and summaries of the book. But starting in Chpt 1 the author chose to emphasize the Mormon religion. Glaringly out of place . Chapter 2 continues the Mormon religion.
Not the topic where I’d expect or want this kind of content - so detailed on the case of the Mormon aviator but none of the other fliers that it seems the author’s sole intent is to proselytize, which is sad as the rest of the story needs telling. Returning for credit.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

OK, But Know What It Is ...

This is an effort at non-fiction history by a legal scholar regarding the lead up to and trial of four Japanese war criminals in Shanghai after World War II regarding their involvement in the treatment and earlier trial of Doolittle Raiders who were captured in China. Three of the Raiders were executed after incredibly perfunctory proceedings.

If you are looking for a detailed treatment of the Doolittle Raid itself, this is not your book. That said, it is a pretty interesting treatment of the subject matter, although it drags in parts. As is so often the case, a good editing would have helped the book move along, and would probably have lessened its length by about 20 percent.

As a lawyer myself, I found the description of the trial and its preparation interesting. It is extremely difficult working with clients and witnesses who speak only (or mainly) a foreign language. Working through interpreters is sometimes necessary, but a difficult experience. It really surprised me that the Army allowed Edmund Bodine, a pilot who had attended law school but did not have a law degree and who was not a lawyer at the time, to serve as lead defense counsel. That said, he did a credible job in performing a largely thankless task.

The great frustration in the whole story--and one that is driven home by the author--is that those who were more culpable were not part of the trial. The author attributes much of this to interference from MacArthur (or his minions) who were focused on rebuilding Japan. I don't know if that is fair or accurate, but it sounds about right.

As noted, the book tends to drag in places. Another shortcoming of the book is that it contains an extremely truncated and unfulfilling afterward about what happened to the protagonists involved in the trial. That was disappointing.

The result of the trial will be frustrating, one way or the other, to almost everyone. The one thing the book establishes beyond much doubt, however, is that the Japanese defendants got a fair trial. The captured Doolittle Raiders surely did not.

The narration is quite good. My only qualm is that some of the Japanese pronunciations seem a bit off, although the author does well with German later in the book--so maybe my qualm is not fair. Overall, very listenable.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

if your heroes are lawyers and war criminals.....

Sorry, but this book was way too sympathetic to the Japanese soldiers, who were truly war criminals. The "heroes" in this book were the lawyers, who seemed to be motivated in making a name for themselves.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

could not download.

could not download more than half of the book. Would like to cancel this book.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great Untold Story

I knew about Doolittle Raid but now know the fate of the missing crews. This book was at times boring but does keep you interested. The book was not much about the mission (which is what I was expecting and hoping for) but more of the trials which made it interesting. Well researched and well written, easy to understand for being a trial. Overall a great book to read.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

It’s great

It really broke down the trial and added a human element to it more words

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 09-12-21

Not what I was looking for

Misleading title-
My own fault- I should have done some more research before purchasing this book. This is not really a book about the Dolittle Raids (which is what I was looking for) but a careful look into the aftermath of the raids and war crimes trials that occurred after WWII in Japan and China.

Whilst it was not what I was looking for, it is comprehensive and well written. I like how the author presents both sides of the argument and challenges your thinking about war crimes and justice,

At times the events described in this book seemed hypocritical and made me uncomfortable,

I am still looking for a good NF text on the Raids.