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John Halifax, Gentleman

Narrated by: Peter Newcombe Joyce
Length: 22 hrs and 58 mins
3 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The greatest romantic narrative novel of the early 19th century, John Halifax, Gentleman tells the story of an orphan boy whose first words in the story are, 'Sir, I want work; may I earn a penny?'

By hard work, diligent study and an unshakeable faith in his God, John attains wealth and happiness, despite much hardship and heartbreak throughout his life.

The story chronicles the class movement of the time and gives us a remarkable description of social, political and industrial change.

Set in Gloucestershire in the heart of England and told by Phineas, his soul mate and lifelong friend, who observes John through all his glorious moments, self-doubt and resolution, the story is simple, uplifting and heroic. It is a detailed study of a man and his family that also presents the listener with a broad view of Britain during one of its most troubled times.

A genuine classic, most entertaining and certainly a tale which lives up to the appellation, epic in its conception and delivery. John Halifax, Gentleman was first published in 1856. This is the first unabridged recording of Dinah Craik's masterpiece.

Public Domain (P)2007 Assembled Stories

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Tedious

Dramatic reading is great, but this narrator is way too dramatic. If you want to read a sweeping Victorian novel, I recommend Middlemarch. This one is tedious.