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Publisher's Summary

London, 1841. Returned from their adventures in India, Jeremiah Blake and William Avery have both had their difficulties adapting to life in Victorian England. Moreover, time and distance have weakened the close bond between them, forged in the jungles of India. Then a shocking series of murders in the world of London's gutter press forces them back together. The police seem mysteriously unwilling to investigate, then connections emerge between the murdered men and the growing and unpredictable movement demanding the right to vote for all. In the backstreets of Drury Lane, among criminals, whores, pornographers, and missionaries, Blake and Avery must race against time to find the culprit before he kills again. But what if the murderer is being protected by some of the highest powers in the land?

©2016 Original Material © 2016 by M.J. Carter. Recorded by arrangement with G.P. Putnam's Sons, an imprint of Penguin Publishing Group, a division (P)2016 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    207
  • 4 Stars
    145
  • 3 Stars
    63
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    4
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    1

Performance

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    102
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    15
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    3
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Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Addicting

It's been awhile since I devoured 2 books in as many days. I thoroughly enjoyed the second book in which I hope will be a long series.

M. J. Carter creates a great maze of a story, you venture in and you must go forward. She draws great characters and plausible suspects, few are what they seem. Set against the highly volatile Chartist and reform movements in mid 19th century England. The history of these movements is well explained, and did not bog down the story at all. I can't wait for the next book.

It doesn't hurt at all that another favorite author of mine Imogen Robertson gave a very positive review of Ms. Carter's work.

Alex Wyndham once again gives a stellar performance. He had one hell of a lot of accents to deal with and he carries them off flawlessly. I can listen to him for hours.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good, but not as good as the first book

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend it if they have listened to the first one. The characters are both fleshed out more than in The Strangler VIne and the story is decent. As before, there is historical background, though to me not as interesting as what happened in India in the first book.

What other book might you compare Infidel Stain to and why?

This is my main gripe about this book. How many Victorian era London mysteries do we need? There are already thousands upon thousands. I think the author should have stayed in India.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Two sittings will suffice.

Any additional comments?

I loved the chemistry between Blake and Avery, which has developed since the first book. My main gripe is that the story was not as compelling as in the first book, and that it is situated in Victorian London. That was almost done to death decades ago.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

should of stayed in India

What was one of the most memorable moments of Infidel Stain?

The author M.J. Carter changes the setting from sunny exotic India to a cold, class oriented,muddy London losing half the charm of his first book The Strangler Vine. In London his hero character are a little too reminiscent of Holmes and Watson.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Didn't Live Up to The Strangler Vine

I LOVED the Strangler Vine for its meandering adventure story line. It reminded me a lot of Heart of Darkness. This book tried to imitate that, and fell a bit short. I think it was a mistake to try to take Blake and Avery out of India--that was a lot of the charm of the first book. Dropping them in London just didn't have the same effect. I enjoyed the read, but I won't be rushing on to the third book...

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Boring!

Any additional comments?

I thought I'd give this second one in the Blake and Avery series a try. Unfortunately, it was very boring to me and dragged on. I actually think I like Alex Wyndham's narration so much that I chose the book for that alone. However, even with his excellent narration I just couldn't make myself finish it. The little street urchin girl is the best character, but Blake is almost too low key in this and he was my favorite character in the first book. I just didn't find the story interesting.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

What a pair.

What made the experience of listening to Infidel Stain the most enjoyable?

The entire production and, of course, the story are great.

Who was your favorite character and why?

All character have their own charm.

What does Alex Wyndham bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Excellent voicing of characters.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

See the twist and turns of the story as well as those of 19th c London.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

It's Avery and Blake....

....that drew me to this one, after listening to "The Strangler Vine". I was interested in the continuing collaberation. Not quite as intriguing as the first book, but theses are great characters and the historical setting is interesting. Also enjoyed the supporting characters.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Another Great Historical Adventure

Where does Infidel Stain rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

In the top 10%. Memorable characters, a mystery and a look at the grimness of 19th century England for the non-wealthy. M.J. Carter covers the painful birth of a new middle class, prison reform, trade unions and labor laws as workers displaced by budding technology seek to find a voice in government. I look forward to more Blake and Avery.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Janice
  • Sugar Land, TX, United States
  • 11-14-17

Let down

The second entry in the Blake & Avery series is a decided letdown from the debut. As other reviewers have already observed, the story being relocated from the exotic jungles of India to the grimy streets of London lost much of the charm found in the first story. But even judging this story on its own, not in comparison to its predecessor, I found this one to be slow paced and unfocused.

As historical fiction it competently described the deplorable class disparities keeping the aristocracy rich and everyone else suppressed and poor, to the point of incarcerating homeless children in adult prisons. The conflicts within the Chartist Movement are likewise well described, placing the story at hand in context. But as a murder investigation, the plot is weighed down by the variety of characters with unclear roles in the mystery. We learn a bit more about Blake and Avery’s back stories, but it doesn’t really enhance true character development. They don’t work well together, as Blake keeps all his thoughts to himself and Avery is morally outraged at the realities of street life, and not trusting Blake’s instincts. I pretty much knew who the murderer probably was, but there was so much background noise going on with the cast of dozens that any sense of urgency or tension was never developed.

As the reader, Alex Wyndham did well with most of the characters, but two Irishmen sadly had voices that brought certain Muppet characters to mind. And as happens too often, finding a way to voice females and children apparently eluded Mr. Wyndham. Mild recommendation for those who enjoyed Blake and Avery and want more, but can’t offer more enthusiasm than that.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Fun adventure with great characters

Not as good as Strangler Vine, but fun continuation of Blake and Avery's friendship. Also, interesting history of early 1800 English politics.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful