Horrible Histories: Savage Stone Age

Narrated by: Terry Deary
Length: 53 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (14 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Learn all about the Savage Stone Age, with all the nasty bits left in. You probably thought that Stone Age people spent all their time standing stones up on one end and rubbing sticks together to make fires.

©1999 Terry Deary & Martin Brown (P)2013 Scholastic UK

What listeners say about Horrible Histories: Savage Stone Age

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Sooooooooooooo cool funny and hilarious

Same review as vicious Vikings. Go look at that one one more thing more I want more (btw I’m 9 and a girl )

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Homeschooling

We are radical UNschoolers and this series is GREAT. Engaging, funny, interesting! And educational. We also enjoy the horrible maths and science books.

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  • Wendy
  • 07-06-16

Great fun

My six year old absolutely loves this series. Keeps him laughing all the way through. Nicely produced with brilliant and engaging narration.

5 people found this helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 06-05-20

Not The Best In The Series, Not Without It’s Charma

Horrible Histories was one of my earliest obsessions as a child and I’ve been enjoying the nostalgia in revisiting these old audiobooks. There’s really no other series like them. They mix a childlike love for mischief with genuinely unsettling and gory facts about history that many adults would also find fascinating. I think there’s a strange attraction to fear that we’re all born with. We can never keep our eyes away from a train wreck. It’s simply too engaging. These stories get to the core of that in children and manage to explain complex conflicts to them in a way they can understand. I really admire Deary’s anti-authority worldview and encouragement to kids to be open minded. History can be different for different people. There is no one narrative. These are important lessons which he boils down to very simple, coherent concepts. Unfortunately, I must admit that Savage Stone Age has always been my least favourite. Even as a kid, the humour seemed out of control. While the audiobooks were always silly, they remained gory history lessons at their core. However, the framework in this case is a fictional visit to Stonehenge where Deary talks to the tourists about history. I know it’s a children’s series but this book has significantly less edge than many in the series and I think that’s a shame. Adults won’t get as much out of the series as kids, especially in this format (the books are perhaps somewhat more palatable) - but the history itself is still engaging with enough gory details to justify the weak framework. The performances are fittingly lively and energetic. The corny humour surprisingly hits the occasional zinger. It’s charmingly innocent while being dark and nihilistic. It’s totally unique to its series and for that reason I think it’s still kind of fascinating. Not to mention that with anything from this series, it comes with remarkable strength