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Publisher's Summary

Do the lessons passed down to us by history, lessons whose origins may lie hundreds, even thousands of years in the past, still have value for us today? Is Santayana's oft-repeated saying, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it," merely a way to offer lip service to history as a teacher - or can we indeed learn from it? And if we can, what is it that we should be learning?

In this unflinching series of 36 lectures, a world-renowned scholar makes the case that we not only can learn from history, but must.

Drawing on decades of experience as a classical historian, Professor Fears explores history's patterns to conclude that ignoring them - whether by choice or because we've never learned to see them - is to risk becoming their prisoner, repeating the mistakes that have toppled leaders, nations, and empires throughout time.

In this personal reflection on history, Professor Fears has taken on the challenge of extracting the past's lessons in ways that speak to us today, showing us how the experience of ancient empires such as those of Rome and Persia have much to teach us about the risks and responsibilities of being a superpower.

He shows how the study of those who left their impact on an earlier world - Caesar Augustus or Genghis Khan, George Washington or Adolf Hitler, Mahatma Gandhi or Josef Stalin - can equip us to make responsible choices as nations, citizens, or individuals in a post-9/11 world where those choices are more crucial than ever.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2007 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2007 The Great Courses

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Best set of lectures in the great courses

I have listened to many of the lectures given by the great courses and this is by far the most relevant, most eloquently performed and the most informative of all of the lectures I have listened to so far. The professor was engaging, the subject matter was well prepared and the information was brought into the perspective of our own day and age. Rufus Fears shall indeed be missed.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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History in broad strokes

Any additional comments?

An insightful, entertaining search for the patterns of history. Reminds me of a quote attributed to Mark Twain: “History doesn't repeat itself but it often rhymes".

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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A great performance on the myth of history

If history is a lie we choose to believe, than these lectures deliver it in a palatable form. I think of this as a counter balance to Zinn revisionist history. It gives clear, almost simplistic "lessons" we learn from all of history. Dr Fears always gives a performance that, to me, even rivals Dan Carlin.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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Anecdotal over fact

What disappointed you about The Wisdom of History?

After many hours of listening, the author made his way to Abe Lincoln, a subject I know a bit about. In order to tidily fit his narrative of connecting Lincoln's contribution to history as some sort of divinely directed happening, he makes a point that Lincoln died on Good Friday. This detail works great for his "last great hope" tale and messianic purpose of Lincoln - only thing is - it's just not true! Lincoln died the day after Good Friday. As a scholar of history, he surely knows this, and while it may be a small detail, it made me wonder how many other areas of history were scrubbed for nicely fitting anecdotes to work. If I elect to listen to an 18-hour lecture, I want the truth not hyperbole.

What was most disappointing about The Great Courses’s story?

Not knowing if I was being hoodwinked.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

disappointment

10 of 19 people found this review helpful

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best book yet!

narrator was engaging, story was terrific. every American needs to listen to this book, now!

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Misleading and simplistic

After reading such good reviews of Fears, I was disappointed in this class. Fears is a dramatic and even spellbinding lecturer, but he often presents a misleading view of history. For example, he asserts that WW II would not have occurred without Adolph Hitler — even though it’s highly conjectural whether the Germans would have refrained from war under a different leader (and, Hitler or not, the Japanese were waging war in Asia). He also claims that wars last longer when democracies are involved, which fails to account for the 100-years war and other multidecadal wars during Europe’s bloody history long before democracies emerged. I really wanted to like this class. But I gave up after three lectures because I no longer found it credible.

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Brilliant and forceful!

I wish every American would take the time to listen to this audio book and ponder the legacy we leave behind!!

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Application to everyday life

What made the experience of listening to The Wisdom of History the most enjoyable?

Being a history buff and applying lessons learned from history to my everyday life, this was a book that was EXTREMELY interesting to me. The practical application of lessons that have been taught time and time again throughout history allows for a new perspective on lifeto be fored.

What did you like best about this story?

The multiple examples of the impact of behavioral patterns have developed over time was the biggest takeaway for me.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

no, it was more of a textbook for me.

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amazing lecture series!

this is a completely amazing at lecture series! Everyone should be required to listen to it. Being a student of history is extremely important. Dr. fears really describes this well.

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I learned a lot! It opens your eyes

This book opened my eyes to what's been universally important through history. It's helped me discover what steps I should take in order to live better.

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  • Deus
  • 01-19-17

A lecture by Uncle Sam himself

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

It will be enjoyed more by the jingoistic crowd from America. The America F&$k yeah type.

What could The Great Courses have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Removing factual inaccuracies. His grasp of history seems very slim.

What about Professor J. Rufus Fears’s performance did you like?

Nice storytelling.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Wisdom of History?

The later aspects involving Lincoln, Roosevelt and the Vietnam war.

Any additional comments?

Please do not label this as "The wisdom of world history". That is false advertising. This should be labelled as "An American perspective on world history" or something of the sort. This is the most biased course I've ever listened to. Even things I generally agree with come out as propaganda in the manner with which it is told.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Atreides
  • 10-31-14

The wisdom of history (assuming you're American)

Prepare to have history analysed from an American perspective and to have it assumed that you are also living in America. This was the strongest impression I got from this book, which was otherwise quite easily forgettable. The lecturer's voice is pleasant to listen to, and he tells a good overview of history as an engaging story. However I don't think that I have taken away much wisdom from this lecture.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful