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Publisher's Summary

Translated by W. E. D. Rouse, The March of the Ten Thousand is one of the most admired and widely read pieces of ancient literature to come down to us. Xenophon employs a very simple, straightforward style to describe what is probably the most exciting military adventure ever undertaken. When Cyrus, brother to the Great King of Persia, attempts to overthrow his feckless sibling in 401 B.C., he employs a Greek mercenary army of 10,000 hoplites as the core of his rebellious force. Xenophon, who seeks the advice of Socrates before joining, is among the common soldiers. Inexorably, Cyrus and his huge army march southward 1,500 miles from the coast of Ionia all the way to Babylon, and there give battle to Artaxerxes, the Great King. Although the battle is soon decided in favor of Cyrus, the would-be usurper is killed while in pursuit of the king. Meanwhile, the Greeks are victorious on their part of the battlefield and await the return of Cyrus and his instructions.

By the next morning, they realize that Cyrus is dead and that his allies have melted away in the night, leaving them alone trapped behind enemy lines within a few miles of the Persian capital. And only a few miles distant lies an enormous Persian army with vengeance in mind. Despair deepens when the Greek officer corps is treacherously murdered during peace talks. Alone, leaderless and hopelessly outnumbered, the Greeks nevertheless elect new officers.

Xenophon steps into the pages of history with his magnificent rallying speeches and selfless acts of courage. Follow one of history's most spirited bands of soldiers as they fight and maneuver their way through 1,500 miles of hostile territory seething with adversaries. It is an epic of courage, faith and democratic principle.

Copyright © Audio Connoisseur 2003

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  • Overall

Leadership

Few people are prepared to lead. Xenophon was and did. He led from a sense of obligation and not priviledge. To read this book is to take a masters level course in leadership.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
  • Story

Great story - excellent narration

the classic story of heroism and Leadership as useful today as it was 2500 years ago.

wish there was an introduction explaining the context of the story

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Excellent read.

One of the best audio books I have ever read. If you fancy adventure and history. this hits both right on the head.

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Great

Great story, well read and well written/translated. It is a classic for a reason! Don't think about just get it and listen.

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  • Performance
  • Story

Charlton Griffin brings the ancient world to life!

What was one of the most memorable moments of The March of the Ten Thousand?

The death of Cyrus and the battlefield promotion of a whole new set of officers including the author Xenophon himself.

Have you listened to any of Charlton Griffin’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Yes, Alexander the Great by Arrian and The Egyptian by Mika Waltari. Charlton Griffin reminds me a of Attenborough or maybe Charlton Heston; he has a deep resonant voice that sounds avuncular and wise. I pictured some old fellow in a toga reading to me or reciting these stories all by wrote. A good reader makes or breaks material this densely packed; Mr. Griffin is excellent.

  • Overall

Great History Made Dull

Xenophon is a fascinating, lively author writing about very interesting times indeed. As for the reader, imagine Shakespeare being read by someone who didn't like or understand it but wanted to speak clearly. He did not convey a sense that he cared about his subject matter or wished to bother trying to convey it in a manner that would draw in the listener.

1 of 6 people found this review helpful