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Publisher's Summary

Mississippi, 1955: 14-year-old Emmett Till was murdered by a white mob after making flirtatious remarks to a white woman, Carolyn Bryant. Till's attackers were never convicted, but his lynching became one of the most notorious hate crimes in American history. It launched protests across the country, helped the NAACP gain thousands of members, and inspired famous activists like Rosa Parks to stand up and fight for equal rights for the first time. Part detective story, part political history, Tyson revises the history of the Till case using a wide range of new sources, including the only interview ever given by Carolyn Bryant. In a time where discussions of race are once again coming to the fore, Tyson redefines this crucial moment in civil rights history.

©2017 Timothy B. Tyson (P)2017 Dreamscape Media, LLC

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jean
  • Santa Cruz, CA, United States
  • 07-15-17

Edifying

In 1955 an all-white male jury found the two white defendants not guilty of killing a black boy even though they had confessed to the crime. This is one of the worst incidents of “Southern Justice” in our nation’s history. The victim was a fourteen-year-old black boy from Chicago who was visiting a relative in Mississippi. The boy who had polio when younger was accused of provoking a white woman, Carolyn Bryant, with a wolf whistle and flirtation. Her husband, Roy Brant and her half -brother, J. W. Milan, then beat-up and lynched the boy.

Many books have been written about this case. What sets Tyson’s book apart is the broad view he used to examine the lynching. Tyson does an excellent job with the courtroom scenes. The book is well written and meticulously researched. Tyson examined the records including the trial transcripts and interviews of most of the people involved, including a rare interview with the late Carolyn Bryant. Apparently, Carolyn Bryant wrote her memoir. The manuscript and related papers have been sealed until 2038. The author delves into the social and economic forces that drove Roy Bryant and J. W. Milan to kill Till. Tyson then ties up the case to include the ongoing problems of inequality of justice for blacks today. Tyson is a historian at Duke University so the book is more academic than many books written on the subject.

The book is just over eight and a half hours long. Rhett S. Price does a good job narrating the book. Price is an actor and audiobook narrator.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • D.
  • 05-22-17

Still Relevant

A very important & sad bit of history. Narrator mispronounced Mamie. It is pronounced May-me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Real history

Good look at the beginnings of the civil rights movement! ET'S murder cause many in the north to see the south in a new light. great historical read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Gripping Tale and Story.

Rhett S price did a terrific job narrating the story; he really made it come to life.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent overall

The overall research was awesome. This case was heartbreaking when I learned about it as a child and remains heartbreaking. I loved how the author saw it's correlation to BLM. This story made me cry for the countless Emmet Tills and Trayvon Martins but the narrator was lacking. His mispronunciation of Mamie Till's name was horrible. Instead of Mamie he called her Mammy. But the actual text was so powerful I listened anyway.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great details and collectors item.

The details provided are good. This is a good book for someone who is a history scholar or enthusiast. It's great for someone who wants to do a film based on Emmitt Till. I think Mamie Bradly is a superwoman that isn't touted enough after reading this.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

The whole, whole story

Just when you thought you knew everything about the Emmett Till murder, the final shoe drops. The infamous Carolyn gives her real testimony at last. Even better than any sense of closure, however is the masterfully complete depth of the author's carefully crafted placement of the event definitively within its full historical context. This book is every I wanted it to be and more.
But beware, the narrator has a couple of failings. He didn't bother to learn the correct pronunciation of Emmett's magnificent mother. Every time he calls her "Mammie" you will die just a little inside and wonder why this wounded mother gets so little respect from the twenty-first century man who narrates.
And there is worse. Every time he reads quotes of the various white southern bigots, the narrator indulges not only in delivering accents which are too poorly mimicked but his voice also drips with all the loathing and disgust any of us has for bigots, but are too polite to indulge in.
So even if you can't get over the mangling delivery of the narrator, please do read this history.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • "unknown"
  • Grandview, MO, United States
  • 03-13-17

Voices the author uses are terrible

The voices used by the narrator distracted from an otherwise compelling and important narrative. Unfortunate.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent Book Worth 5 Stars *****

This true story recounts the cruel kidnapping and savage murder of a fourteen year old youngster in the racist Mississippi environment of 1955. Speaking from my own point of view, I never believed Emmett whistled at the white lady (Carolyn Bryant) with disrespect in mind but with an impish impulse to show off to his teen friends. Therefore, this makes the brutal consequence of his lighthearted child play even more horrific...if possible. The book is thoroughly researched, well written, and narrated by a brilliant performance artist with a talent to deliver dialogue in various character voices.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great History Lesson

The book contains a rather lengthy discussion of race relations in Mississippi generally around the time of Emmett Till's murder. I thought I knew everything about his death but I learned so much by reading this book. Great history lesson on the South.