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Publisher's Summary

In September Hope, acclaimed historian John C. McManus explores World War II’s most ambitious invasion, an immense, daring offensive to defeat Nazi Germany before the end of 1944. Operation Market-Garden is one of the war’s most famous, but least understood, battles, and McManus tells the story of the American contribution to this crucial phase of the war in Europe.

August 1944 saw the Allies achieve more significant victories than in any other month over the course of the war. Soviet armies annihilated more than 20 German divisions and pushed the hated enemy from Russia to deep inside Poland. General Eisenhower’s D-Day Invasion led to the liberation of France. Encouraged by these triumphs, British, Canadian, and American armored columns plunged into Belgium, Holland, and Luxembourg. The Germans were in disarray, overwhelmed on all fronts, losing soldiers by the thousands as Allied bombers pulverized their cities. For the Third Reich it seemed the end was near. Rumors swirled that the war would soon be over and that everyone would be home for Christmas.

Then came September, and Holland.

On September 17, the largest airborne drop in military history commenced - including two entire American divisions, the 101st and the 82nd. Their mission was to secure key bridges at such places as Son, Eindhoven, Grave, and Nijmegen until British armored forces could relieve them. The armor would slash northeast, breech the Rhine and go wild on the north German plains. However, the Germans were much stronger than the Allies anticipated. In eight days of ferocious combat, they mauled the airborne, stymied the tanks and prevented the Allies from crossing the Rhine. For the first time, using never-before-seen sources and countless personal interviews, September Hope reveals the American perspective on one of the most famous and decisive battles of World War II.

©2012 John C. McManus (P)2012 Gildan Media, LLC

Critic Reviews

“In September 1944 the Allies' heady advances ground to a bloody halt all along the Western Front. John C. McManus's superb September Hope takes us to the heart of some of the most intense and dramatic combat of the entire war. A riveting and deeply moving story of uncommon courage.” (Alex Kershaw, New York Times best-selling author of The Longest Winter)
“A fine account of one of the Second World War's most fraught and frustrating battles. John C. McManus's extensive research allows him to tell the story with verve and authority.” (Rick Atkinson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of An Army at Dawn)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Alan
  • Sunrise, FL, United States
  • 03-06-13

Go yanks go !

A good retelling of A Bridge Too Far. What is really needed for this audiobook is a pdf supplement with various maps showing key engagements. Narrator does a good job. This is one of those books that makes you proud to be an American.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Good Story no so great Narrator

If you could sum up September Hope in three words, what would they be?

American Airborne in Holland

What was one of the most memorable moments of September Hope?

The Eisenhower-Montgomery exchange in chapter 1 of the book.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

I did not like Mr. Dixion as a narator/reader in fact I nearly returned the book because I did not like his style of narration. He seemed almost monotone, he tried to do accents, this did not go well and (personal item) he called I Company first company throughtout most of the book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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A new view of market garden!

Market Garden was not an messy loss. The soldiers of the US fought as if it was their own hometown being fought over. After reading this book I was proud of our troops performance. At times the British held back waiting for orders when a little iniative could have made all the difference in reaching Arnham!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • JURANDYR
  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 07-31-17

Grueling Personal Experiences, Big Time Flawed Brass Decisions

This book is a must for Market Garden aficionados, and a great source of information about the galant participation of American Airborne divisions in the famous failed operation. The book also includes an equally gripping account of the participation of American troops in the grueling battle for the Scheldt estuary. Excellent book, excellent narrator.

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Outstanding. Must Read for Students of WW2 History

The WW2 generation is dwindling, most have long moved on to be with their comrades. I am deeply grateful to authors like JCM who are documenting these stories before they are lost to us. We need them now more then ever before. September Hope delivers the experience of MG right along with the characters and timeline of events. Outstanding work.

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  • David
  • San Jose, CA United States
  • 09-24-12

Nice to see this side of the Arnhem story

This ranks with "It never snows in September" as an important contribution to the Market Garden literature. You can find bits and pieces in books like Band of Brothers but I am not aware of any other volume like this which is not a memior. Well read and is told coherently. Coherence is a problem with a battle as large as Market Garden.

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  • Charles
  • LYNDON STATION, WISCONSIN, United States
  • 09-10-12

Interesting Outlook from our side.

Very interesting viewing this part of history from the side of the United States. A part I have never heard of before.

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  • Story

Not bad, not great.

What did you love best about September Hope?

An allied side of the story

Which character – as performed by Walter Dixon – was your favorite?

No character per se, but he does try different dialects that help discern between which country the individual may have been from.

Any additional comments?

While it states an American viewpoint, there is quite a bit of British and other allied stories involved. Which is a good thing in my opinion.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful