Regular price: $24.95

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

How the United States underdeveloped Appalachia

Appalachia - among the most storied and yet least understood regions in America - has long been associated with poverty and backwardness. But how did this image arise, and what exactly does it mean? In Ramp Hollow, Steven Stoll launches an original investigation into the history of Appalachia and its place in US history, with a special emphasis on how generations of its inhabitants lived, worked, survived, and depended on natural resources held in common.

Ramp Hollow traces the rise of the Appalachian homestead and how its self-sufficiency resisted dependence on money and the industrial society arising elsewhere in the United States - until, beginning in the 19th century, extractive industries kicked off a "scramble for Appalachia" that left struggling homesteaders dispossessed of their land. As the men disappeared into coal mines and timber camps, and their families moved into shantytowns or deeper into the mountains, the commons of Appalachia were, in effect, enclosed, and the fate of the region was sealed.

Ramp Hollow takes a provocative look at Appalachia and the workings of dispossession around the world by upending our notions about progress and development. Stoll ranges widely from literature to history to economics in order to expose a devastating process whose repercussions we still feel today.

©2017 Steven Stoll (P)2017 Audible, Inc.

More from the same

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    16
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    10

Performance

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    18
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    7

Story

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    18
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    6
Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lawrence
  • Monroeville, PA, United States
  • 12-18-17

Content A; Performance F-

Well researched and well written. Too bad the narrator spoils it with a sound-crushing bad delivery. The CIA doesn’t need to waterboard terrorists. Just have this guy read to them; they’ll talk.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Unable to finish

Admittedly, I bought this on the premise that I wanted to learn more about West Virginia. And in the 2 hours+ I listened, there were references to WV. However, the narrative was so "mechanical" I actually thought several times the book was read by computer. I tried speeding the book to 1.25, hoping I could get through it. . but no luck.

If you buy this book, I wish you all the best.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Painful to listen to!

I have listened to hundreds of books on tape, on CDs and now on Audible for decades. I have never before found it impossible to continue to listen based on the reader as opposed to the content. I feel very sorry for the author as the books seems to be genuinely interesting but I just cannot keep listening!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Hybrid extraordinaire

Economic theory exemplified by the historical geography of Appalachia, as a hybrid treatment quite a "home run."

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Very Interesting

I like that the book makes clear the connections between historical happenings centuries ago that are not traditionally taught, shared and still affect our culture and government. History truly does repeat itself. "Nothing is new under the sun."

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Awful

This book has no flow whatsoever. You hang in there and then toward the end the author goes into lacy bashing of conservative tilt of the state in more recent times without understanding why that might be. What a waste of time.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Couldn’t get past chapter 2

Super tedious, i was looking forward to hearing a compelling story of the Appalachian region, way too detailed and academic...missed opportunity on the soul of the region.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Narrator not a good choice

I tried to listen to this book but I wish they’d chosen a different narrator. His voice was lifeless and predictable.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Could not get into it

It was tedious and just too wordy. Not my cup of tea. I am from this area so I hoped it would be interesting rather than just historic. It is more a textbook.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Jim
  • Holland, TX, United States
  • 01-17-18

The Effete Intellectual’s Guide to Appalachia

Mr. Stoll writes for that teeming mob of us who wish to define the socio-economics of holler-and-mountaintop hillfolk: their sufferings under capitalism post industrial revolution, how their existence was explained by writers through the years, how they were sealed off from the rest of society, their environs stripped away by the rich and powerful. If that’s your idea of a good time get the book and you’ll be as happy as a grad student in slop. If you seek a less intellectually obfuscated narrative, without the blurring drop phrases of the politically conscious academic, a book you can enjoy sans politics, look elsewhere.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful