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Editorial Reviews

Kevin Stillwell’s rich voice captures the vivid nuances of Lee and His Men at Gettysburg. a comprehensive history of the Battle of Gettysburg by American writer Clifford Dowdey. His intense performance underlines the importance of the 1863 conflict, which resulted in nearly 50,000 deaths and is considered to be the turning point in the American Civil War. This meticulously researched audiobook focuses on the Confederate troops, led by the brilliant General Robert E. Lee, and the series of events that led to their ultimate downfall.

Publisher's Summary

In this sweeping account Clifford Dowdey recreates one of the most important battles in U.S. history. With vivid and breathtaking detail, Lee and His Men at Gettysburg is both a historical work and an honorary ode to the almost 50,000 soldiers who died at the fields of Pennsylvania. Written with an emphasis on the Confederate forces, the book captures the brilliance and frustration of a general forced to contend with overwhelming odds and in-competent subordinates. Dowdey not only presents the facts of war, but brings to life the cast of characters that defined this singular moment in American history.

©1958 Clifford Dowdey as Death of a Nation. Copyright renewed 1986, 2011 by Carolyn Dunaway (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Lively, critical, judicious and scholarly." (Henry Steele Commager, New York Times)

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Solid book

Almost exclusively a Confederate view of Gettysburg. Excellent narration. The book starts with a scathing critique of Jefferson Davis’ poor strategy and micromanagement. The author argues that Davis’ taking away experienced units from Lee’s army caused the Gettysburg defeat before the campaign even started.

Also, goes in great depth how many of the general officers in his army sabotaged Lee’s strategy- with special attention placed on the failings of Longstreet and JEB Stuart.

I learned new things and gained a deeper perspective, which is what I look for in a Civil War book. Not perfect, but a very solid effort.

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Read This Book

There's an endless stream of narrative histories and commentaries on the battle of Gettysburg.

This book stands out in it's details about Ewell, Hill and Longstreet, and their difficulties with corps command under Lee's system of "discretionary orders."

Stuart--the obvious scapegoat--also receives a chapter of detailed description about the unhappy results of his discretionary attempt to follow Lee's orders.

Most accounts of the battle have demonstrated Longstreet's reluctance to carry out his orders on the second and third days of the battle. Monster doesn't deviate from this standpoint, but he goes much farther in demonstrating the crippling effect of General Longstreet's unwillingness to follow Lee's plans.

Of Hill and Ewell, their shortcomings likewise emerge in great clarity from the author's description.

The South's failure at Gettysburg is far more comprehensible than ever before, due to the author's insight, and his skill in conveying it.

  • Overall

great book

well written and accurate. A excellent study of all the events in the three days at Gettysburg. Recommend it to all with an interest in the civil war.