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Publisher's Summary

"Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" So goes the signature introduction of New York Herald star journalist Henry Morton Stanley to renowned explorer Dr. David Livingstone, who had been missing for six years in the wilds of Africa. Into Africa ushers us into the meeting of these remarkable men. In 1866, when Livingstone journeyed into the heart of the African continent in search of the Nile's source, the land was rough, unknown to Europeans, and inhabited by man-eating tribes. The man sent to find him was an orphan and a drifter who had great ambition but little success to show for it. The book shows how, over the course of their nine-year relationship, Stanley ironically rose in power and prominence while Livingstone was relegated to isolation and danger in Africa.
©2003 Martin Dugard; (P)2003 Books On Tape, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"It is rare when a historical narrative keeps readers up late into the night....But author and adventurer Dugard...makes a suspenseful tale out of journalist Stanley's successful trek through the African interior to find and rescue a stranded Livingstone....This is a well-researched, always engrossing book." (Publishers Weekly)
"Dugard imbues the narrative with a keen sense of urgency that propels this compelling account along." (Booklist)
"An action-packed recounting of one of the most famous incidents in the history of exploration. Fine entertainment for adventure buffs, solidly researched and fluently told." (Kirkus)
"Crisp vivid language...transports the armchair adventurer from the jungle muck to the mountain peak." (Esquire)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
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  • Story

Great information not a real easy listen

Would you listen to Into Africa again? Why?

No its quite wordy and jumps around alot.

What other book might you compare Into Africa to and why?

It reminded me of the Forgotten 500. Information worth knowing not the best delivery ever. Although the narrator was pretty good.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Dr. Livingston I presume? Of course!

Any additional comments?

Gives the reader a great perspective on Africa and explorers of that time.

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The age of exploration is complete

Would you consider the audio edition of Into Africa to be better than the print version?

Columbus, Magellan, Lewis and Clark, Shackleton, the history of mans struggle to know the world around them is not complete without the Stanley and Livingstone. Amazing story, and it was all done with so little.

What other book might you compare Into Africa to and why?

Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose

Which scene was your favorite?

"Dr. Livingstone I presume"

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I would say I was in ahhh of all the things that can possibly go wrong and did.

Any additional comments?

Small segment of history most people know little about.

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  • Heather
  • Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
  • 01-25-14

Would have liked more pictures.

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I might recommend the book to certain friends, but I would suggest reading rather than listening. It's an intriguing and important story in history. The characters are worth following. However, I felt at a loss without a map of their respective journeys and frequently felt the urge to "flip back" to find out which time period I was in and what was revealed about that person previously. I would suggest at least reading up on the history of Livingstone and Stanley to know the outline of the story before trying to listen to it in this format.

Which scene was your favorite?

It's hard to pick one favorite. My favorite scenes in true life adventure stories are at the points where I think the people can't possibly survive what is happening to them, even though the reader knows they will. Stanley calmly facing the men conspiring to kill him, Livingstone persisting through one tropical affliction after another. I was also moved by the procession that carried Livingstone's body to the coast so it could be returned to England.

Could you see Into Africa being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

I would appreciate that, because it was difficult for me to picture the both landscape and the scale of the expeditions moving through it. It could be an excellent movie. Benedict Cumberbatch as Stanley; Jim Broadbent as Livingstone.

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Exploration Lovers Delight

What did you like best about this story?

I love geographical exploration, especially in this time period and the details were captivating. I have difficulty reading about the mistreatment of animals and/or people, so I appreciated how Duggard handled those few instances and focused on the exploration.

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  • Peter
  • Prince George, BC, Canada
  • 07-23-13

History Lesson with High Adventure!

Any additional comments?

I've always wanted to know the story behind these two men. The author explains everything from the point of view of several of the key players. The story revealed some very interesting and surprising facts about these two men and some of the people involved.

I'm not qualified to say if it was well researched, but I found the book fascinating and gut wrenching. Thoroughly enjoyable history lesson about real life high adventure.

As a result of this book, I am now interested in finding a book about the global newspaper industry of the era.

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  • ximena
  • ARLINGTON, VA, United States
  • 03-13-13

Reads like historical fiction with amazing detail

Livingstone and Stanley in Africa should be a gripping story. Unfortunately, too many historians manage to get so lost in their details that they forget a story ever took place. Not so with Martin Dugard.

Dugard has a great command of the art of storytelling, and he manages to incorporate so many details and so much information along the way that I feel I learned more about the subject than any ten textbooks could have taught me -- but without the pain.

Lee's reading is clear and entertaining -- his accents are sometimes accurate and sometimes amusing, but always kept me wanting to hear more.

Well worth a listen.

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Spasmodic Narrative

A good book for anyone intrigued by Livingstone and his travels, it gives in-depth account of Livingstone's last journey which uses sources from the period including Livingstone and Stanley's journal entries. However the book does have some significant negatives.

The main negative for me was the spasmodic layout of the narrative - the story jumps jumps back and forth unnecessarily in the timeline and characters appear abruptly, are flooded with backstory and then drop out of the narrative only to reappear at random.

The narrator was good overall but manages to over-annunciate every single word which eventually drove me slightly insane.

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Most amazing

What did you love best about Into Africa?

The incredible strength, endurance, and persistence and of the human species. How was it possible under conditions that are so far below basic survival needs, the human spirit can still excel. This audiobook should be mandatory listening in every history class in America. This audiobook renewed my faith in the wondrous abilities of human spirit. We ARE an incredible, tenacious and gifted species. All we need to do is persist.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Dr Livingston

Which character – as performed by John Lee – was your favorite?

Dr Livingston

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Humanity is not really a couch potato.

Any additional comments?

I started listening to to this audio book because I wanted to know a little more about Dr Livingston and Stanley and a river called the Nile. I heard the basic story we were told in school, but I wanted to learn the details. Little did I know how many emotions I would feel while listening. Triumph, despair, pride, sadness, sheer joy, wonderment, hope, and a deep respect for those explorers who forged ahead through seemingly impossible odds, to discover and document unknown parts of our wondrous planet. Narrated perfectly by John Lee, who lends a very special quality. Not only is the book cleverly written, but John Lee leads you on an emotional roller coaster of every possible emotion as proficiently as a virtuoso plays a violin. He is the perfect narrator for this book. I give a special thank you to John Lee.

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  • David
  • Halifax, NS, Canada
  • 09-03-12

Perfect

An amazing story, told extremely well. John Lee's narration is superb and Martin Dugard's storytelling is very skilful; it's hard to stop listening. Great work.

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Engrossing and informative

I love historical books that really tell a story about the people involved, and the era in which the action takes place, and if you do, too, this book doesn't disappoint. I read extensively in this genre, and found this book particularly interesting because I really didn't know much of anything about the story beyond Livingstone being an African explorer. Embarrassingly, I knew so little that I assumed he and Stanley were partners in this quest. Boy, did I learn a lot! Both men were truly interesting, with Livingstone emerging as the more purely noble, and Stanley emerging as a little more interesting due to his complexities and character flaws. I don't want to ruin it for you, as the adventure is compelling.

Finally, John Lee is a particular favorite of mine, and his completely credible accents, pacing, and inflection are, as always, top-notch. His narration always makes a good book that much better. Highly recommend this audible book.