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Publisher's Summary

"A black woman's body was never hers alone" --Fannie Lou Hamer, Freedom Fighter

Rosa Parks is often described as a sweet elderly woman, whose tired feet caused her to defy the Jim Crow laws on Montgomery's city buses. Her supposedly solitary and spontaneous act, history tells us, sparked the 1955 bus boycott and gave birth to the civil rights movement. The truth of who Rosa Parks was and what really started the 1955 Boycott is far different than anything previously written. Danielle L. McGuire, brilliant historian, tells the never before told history of how the civil rights movement really began, how it was started in protest against the ritualistic rape of black women by white men, begun in 17th century America, continued unpunished throughout the Jim Crow period when white men abducted and assaulted black women, as a form of retribution or to enforce rules of racial and economic hierarchy; sexually humiliating and assaulting women on streetcars and buses, in taxis and trains. The author writes how sexual violence and interracial rape became a crucial battleground upon which African Americans sought to destroy white supremacy and gain personal and political autonomy; how civil rights campaigns had roots in organized resistance to sexual violence and appeals for protection of black womanhood. Often ignored by civil rights historians, we see how a number of campaigns led to trials and convictions throughout the South and how these cases, broke with Southern tradition, fracturing the philosophical and political foundations of white supremacy and challenging the relationship between sexual domination and racial equality. And at the center of it all, Rosa Parks, who in the 1940s, fifteen years before the Montgomery boycott, was a militant woman and an anti-rape seasoned activist, the great granddaughter of a fair skinned slave woman and a Yankee soldier. Her quiet demeanor and steely determination bravely doing battle against white supremacy.

©2010 Danielle L. McGuire (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

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Truth

I'm a white woman who grew up on Long Island, NY. I was a young girl in the late 50's and watched the news often with my parents. Harlem was often mentioned. I asked my dad if he would take me there. He did. As we drove down the alleys in Harlem, looking at poor like I never could have imagined, I cried for the people who lived there. At my young age before I was eight, I could not understand how they were allowed to live with so little, and no one was helping them. I have always had a heart for black people in my country. I will always understand their protest for better and fair living. At the Dark End of the Street is my favorite book.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Naima
  • Amityville, NY, United States
  • 10-08-12

Listen to This Book

What did you love best about At the Dark End of the Street?

This book will make you cry.

What other book might you compare At the Dark End of the Street to and why?

It was similar to The Warmth of Other Suns in the vivid description of the Jim Crow South.

What does Robin Miles bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Miles is very easy to listen to.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

What is truly amazing is that any group of people could survive the treatment that African people have survived in America. The organization and activism of the community, the courage and dignity of the individuals are all a lesson to inform those interested in organizing and activism and restoring the dignity that was stolen from us.

Any additional comments?

Get it and pass it on!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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great READ

what a wonderful new perspective on African Americans struggle and the woman that moved us forward

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Amazing Scholarship

Well researched. Immensely important history to illuminate! Reinserting the significance and centrality of black women, their lived experiences, and political dynamism into the narrative of our national civil rights movement.
Beautifully read: great vocal energy, pacing, and tone.

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Keisha Sauls

I love this book. It's a must read. I have a different perspective on the world now. All I can say is that it is not right that people can treat people in such a way. The book is very touching.

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Should Be Required Rdg in HS Across USA

Thoroughly appreciated the story and the narration. I did find the content tough to listen to at many points. I couldn't help but think about the women in my own family as far back as my 4th great grandmother Sallie and pray that they never endured the defilement of their bodies. I'd definitely recommend this work to family and friends.

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I Learned A Lot

There are cases presented here that should be taught as part of American History and too often are not. I really appreciated the lessons, however harrowing.

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Wow

What made the experience of listening to At the Dark End of the Street the most enjoyable?

The narration was easy to listen to and added to the feel of the dialogue

What other book might you compare At the Dark End of the Street to and why?

I have never read another book quite like this

Have you listened to any of Robin Miles’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, I haven't

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Reading this book was a very eye opening experience. I was familiar with the history of Civil Rights in America, but was never aware of just how pervasive , common and integral the struggles and horrific experiences of sexualized violence against Black women was to the whole of the Civil Rights movement. It was shocking to me that this was commonplace...I cannot imagine as a woman, living under a system like that. It boggles my mind how much these women went through, and their unrelenting fight for decades for the basic right to have self determination over their own bodies. My father grew up in Waco, TX and he told me stories about groups of white men coming into their side of town asking where to find Black women. I thought it was a sporadic occurrence, by men who were not the norm. Now, I think about my aunts and other women then and if any of these groups of men found what they were looking for and if not, if they took it by force. My oldest aunt once stuck a white man with hat pick after he would not stop harassing her at a bus stop. This book brought it all home. It also explains some of the lingering attitudes that exist towards black women. I can't really articulate my reaction to this.

Any additional comments?

Read this book.

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I cried so.much listening and reading this book.

I cried so.much listening and reading this book. after listening to the first chapter I ordered a paperback copy because I knew this would be an important book. I am both deeply saddened and proud to bean African American woman in this country. It is unfortunate that we are still struggling to defend Black womanhood. this is more than a must read. I learned so much about things I thought I already knew as well as Sheros I never knew the name of.

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Finally!

This is a must read for anyone who ever thought that black women were angry. This gives both insight and reason to those who are reasonable enough to consider that the past might just shape the future.