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Publisher's Summary

Long considered one of the most vibrant and compelling accounts of the battle of Gettysburg by a young resident of the town. Fifteen-year-old Matilda "Tillie" Pierce saw Union general Buford enter town with his cavalry, saw the rout of the first day of fighting, and the Confederates streaming through the town. She gave water to many Union soldiers, including General George Gordon Meade, the new commander of the Army of the Potomac.

She went on to help the nurses and surgeons care for wounded at a house down on Taneytown Road, sitting to comfort the dying General Stephen Weed. Tillie saw the mangled bodies of men and horses, and the incredible destruction of the fields and farms.

A quarter-century later, Tillie, now married and a mother, sat down and penned this remarkable account for her family.

Every memoir of the American Civil War provides us with another view of the catastrophe that changed the country forever.

For the first time, this long out-of-print volume is available as an audiobook.

Public Domain (P)2017 Big Byte Books

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  • Jim
  • Holland, TX, United States
  • 12-28-17

Memoirs of a Muddy Little Girl

This is a charming book worth the price. It was written by Alleman after she was grown and had children. The reader/listener still hears the nine-year-old girl's "voice" in the re-telling. It is full of Victorian sentiment but not enough to get in the way of the story. She was present when two great armies converged on her town from out of nowhere, and she was sent by her family to a neighbor's house to be out of harm's way. There she interacted with various soldiers and civilians, including Generals Mead and Weed.. Without a change of clothes, waiting four days for things to be over, sloshed with mud from the churned up terrain, she was increasing dirty--so much so her mother didn't at first recognize her when she returned home. Get the book.