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Publisher's Summary

In the most devastating political detective story of the 20th century, two Washington Post reporters, whose brilliant, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation smashed the Watergate scandal wide open, tell the behind-the-scenes drama the way it really happened.

Beginning with the story of a simple burglary at Democratic headquarters and then continuing with headline after headline, Bernstein and Woodward kept the tale of conspiracy and the trail of dirty tricks coming - delivering the stunning revelations and pieces in the Watergate puzzle that brought about Nixon's scandalous downfall. Their explosive reports won a Pulitzer Prize for The Washington Post and toppled the president. This is the book that changed America.

©1974 Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward (P)2012 Simon & Schuster

Critic Reviews

"An authentic thriller." ( The New York Times)
"Much more than a 'hot book.' It is splendid reading...of enormous value.... A very human story." ( The New Republic)
"Exhilarating and candid...trip-hammer reportage." ( Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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    5 out of 5 stars
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GOP 'Dirty Tricks': A Riveting History

You wouldn't think this anatomy of a political scandal (which should be dry as dirt) could be so fascinating and relevant over forty years after it brought down a presidency, but so it is. I looked forward to every possible opportunity to listen, and even purchased the Kindle edition in order to finish the book faster. The narrator is excellent, although occasionally the listener can hear him sipping water in between sections or chapters. The book is long, but never boring, and I ended up wishing it had been just a little longer so that Nixon's resignation could have been the final chapter, rather than just his defiant "I am not a crook" speech and his final State of the Union, in which he vowed never to quit.

One caveat: See the excellent movie (with Robert Redford & Dustin Hoffman as Woodward & Bernstein) before listening to or reading the book. The book is far more detailed, but when you see the film first, you'll have a good mental picture of the basic cast of characters that will help you keep them all straight while listening.

Grade: A+

12 of 12 people found this review helpful

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Disturbing. But we knew that.

The narrator was brilliant. You could even hear a bit of Dick Nixon in his voicing of Nixon's words.

Listening to this in July of 2016, I can see the effects of Nixon's paranoia still deeply entrenched in the GOP to this day. And now the bleed over to the far left. "Blame the press" was the Nixon White House's primary line of defense. I am struck at how this correlates to the far left and the mid to far right.

If you can't win on facts, blame the messenger. Unfortunately, it is far more effective now than it was then

We need fewer amateur bloggers and more pros like Bob and Carl. Pros that are committed to getting it right. Pros that see "the competition" getting today's scoop as confirmation of yesterday's, and tomorrow's, stories.

This should be required reading/listening for every voter, every four years.

10 of 13 people found this review helpful

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THE FUMBLING OF AN ASSUAGED

At high school mid to late ‘70s I was really keen on reading mostly books on which movies were based. For example “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”, “Marathon Man”, “Black Sunday”, “The Omen”, “Zorba the Greek”, “To Kill a Mocking Bird” and the book under review. And then I’d read only to make me understand these movies, all of which were in my 2nd language and spoken very hastily.

Then reading “All the President’s Men”, I didn’t have a clue whatsoever as to what it was all about. I was in my mid-teens, on the tip of Africa and knew absolutely nothing about the inner workings of US politics. Upon lending this book to a school friend I asked him what he thought of it (although I myself wasn’t capable of forming any such opinion): “Boring” he said, “like reading a newspaper.” I retorted: “But they ARE newspaper men!” To which he replied “Ok, small wonder; now it makes sense.” My friend obviously knew a little more about form than content.

Listening to this book now refreshed my memory; almost therapeutically allowing me to relive and reconstruct past events―like cheating on myself by only now allowing myself to understand more in retrospect than what had as a teenager been completely incomprehensible to me.

In conclusion allow me these seemingly insignificant acknowledgements. I'd often enhance my vocabulary by jotting down words the meanings of which I didn't know and consult a dictionary. Two of the abovementioned books in their very opening lines already contributed to my vocabulary. Harper Lee’s “Mocking Bird” taught me the word “assuage” and Messrs Woodward and Bernstein gave the word “fumble”. These contributions to what I regard as my intellectual development (political enrichment notwithstanding) I still cherish and am most grateful for even now as an adult, more than 35 years down the line. "The Child is the Father of the Man"—William Wordsworth.

19 of 26 people found this review helpful

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I had forgotten all that really happened...

I had forgotten how much nasty stuff really happened during Watergate and the truly great work that Woodward and Bernstein did. This is a great read and very well narrated by Richard Poe. Anyone interested in history and an amazing true story should refresh with this one.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Resonates now more than ever

I read this in the 70s when I was very young. Coming from a staunchly democratic household, the hearings were on my television every day. As compelling now as it was then. In fact, even more so given the current climate in DC.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Looking forward to Trump's last stand

This is a great book. I can't understand why I never read it before. I can't believe 45 years later we have another "Liar in Chief" that we must bring to justice. Here's hoping our constitutional republic survives again. Thank Thomas Jefferson for "We The People"!

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Truly worthy of its acolades.

Would you listen to All the President's Men again? Why?

I have a deep interest in the life and times of Richard Nixon.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

The narration appropriately recognised the gravity of the situations unfolding as the book progressed.

Which scene was your favorite?

probably the last ounerground meeting with deep throat.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

politics is a shabby game.

Any additional comments?

surprised that it took so long to arrive in the audible collection. the wait was worth it: a compelling account of an extremely interesting periond in american history and politics, and the narration was of a standard worthy of the quality of the book.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Philo
  • San Diego, CA, United States
  • 08-05-17

Stepping stones to our world (of 24-7 publicity)

What jumped out for me here is the folkways of ordinary people, questioned by these reporters, blurting something out, emoting genuinely, in a time and cultural world before every casual act became presumptively on camera and precalculated in its future media effects. I feel for the people who spilled the beans to these reporters with a startling innocence, without looking around six or seven corners ahead. Many then found themselves suddenly and shockingly in the glaring klieg lights of the public gaze. They had some of the charm of pictures in past eras of natives who had never been in front of a camera before. There is something touching about them, I feel a compassion. But I cannot think like them. I lived in a world in some ways made by Watergate and modern media/technologies. It is often an ugly and glaring and slightly paranoiac world, a complexly manipulative world. Maybe this is the eternal lament of an old man.
There are many people in history, in my words, "whose world has, at least in some important aspect, become our world." For reasons seemingly not calculated by anyone, we are in some sense living in their world. The financialized traders of the Jewish stetls are one such group. The people in their times evolved their answers and methods, but something about it stayed and permeated us. The world of Watergate and its characters is another. Reality TV, the world of dishing up one's faults to the eye of the camera as a business model, the tabloid world, took on a special momentum in the Watergate days, and has now risen into the US presidency itself. The presidency and all its drama and characters large and small becoming the biggest TV show on earth was a step along this path. And its acolytes, knowing or not, were these talented fellows, Woodward and Bernstein. This is readily signified by this story itself becoming a glitzy Hollywood movie with them as characters. They became liberal rock stars, so to speak, sages, and have kept these mantles.
But something was lost, too. That something, increasingly alien to young people I come in contact with, was called privacy. It was called decency in a self-restraining way that mouthing the word "decency" now in this posed self-conscious world doesn't say it anymore. We all became a little harder and more calculating -- if we wanted to survive or get ahead. Such are the glories and regrets around every corner in poking through history. Many things lovely and sordid have come and gone. And will again.
As for the writing here, the book is crisp and listenable, the characters and times colorfully portrayed. Washington Post took its modern role alongside New York Times as villain in the eyes of the popular right. I read an anti-Trump editorial in the Post the other day, obviously trying its best to carry on the tradition created by "WoodStein," as these guys were called, but frankly, this one was drivel. What was pathbreaking can become formulaic, and we might forget how good the original in its time was. This book opens all this in my mind.
This book is a little bit paint-by-numbers and partisan for my taste, but it does walk the story through briskly.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Enthralling

The book was very engaging and was kind enough to include explanations for some of the contemporary references. It is very information-dense, and I set it at 0.75x speed sense the narrator was rather on the fast side. I learned a lot about an event that I wasn't around for as though it had been last year. Also, it leaves one with an interesting perspective on present-day events.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Factual retelling of journalists notes

A very thorough retelling of the two Washington Post reporters notes on their coverage of the Watergate affair. Not much fluff or anecdotal material. Can be dry at times but nonetheless interesting.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Lee
  • 12-14-13

Wow!

Where does All the President's Men rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Right up there. 5 stars.

What was one of the most memorable moments of All the President's Men?

The whole thing is memorable. Tense, intriguing and exciting and of course, very concerning.

What about Richard Poe’s performance did you like?

It was perfect. Clear and easy on the ear, it's read with an unhurried authority and weight that matched the seriousness and tension of the tale.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It's pretty breathtaking and heartbreaking too. It also makes you wonder who the new Woodward and Bernstein's would be these days and if any newspaper or publisher would have the belief and balls to stand by such reporting. The Washington Post folk were heroes.

Any additional comments?

I wasn't sure about getting this audiobook as I was already familiar with the story but the writing style and narration is so fascinating from the get go that I was hooked and cannot wait to recommend this to everyone I know. The 12 hr book just flew by without ever outstaying it's welcome. It really was excellent. Go listen!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mrs. T. L. Brown
  • 01-27-13

Gutsy Reporting

The classic book of the two reporters from the Washington Post, who against all odds battled through the lies to get to the truth about Watergate and the cover up that took down the Nixon White House. An amazing piece of history, excellently read and the change in voices are very good.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • keive
  • 03-22-18

History at its finest

I really enjoyed this version of the book. Poe's voice lends itself beautifully to Woodward and Bernstein's novel. 100% recommend.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 02-13-18

RMN

Fast moving story. Yogi once said "its just like deja vous again". Very relevant today.

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  • S Wood
  • 06-18-17

Political classic bang up to date

This is a classic that helps to explain the current American political situation. To understand today listen to yesterday.

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  • S. Moorcroft
  • 07-30-16

Gripping and Extraordinary Account

Unfolds as one of the great detective stories of the modern era., as Washington post reporters Woodward and Bernstien uncover an unprecedented scale of criminality that leads ever closer to the President of the USA Richard M Nixon. There is a moment when Woodward hears an account of Bob Haldman talking of dumping incriminating evidence into the Potomac when the full horror of Nixon's White House becomes clear to him. Nixon's fall less a Shakespearean tragedy than on a par with Brecht's Arturo Ui.