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Publisher's Summary

The potato hack was modeled after an 1849 diet plan for people that were becoming fat and "dyspeptic" from living too luxuriously. This potato diet simply called for one to eat nothing but potatoes for a few days at a time, promising that fat men become as "lean as they ought to be." One hundred and sixty-seven years later, we are fatter and sicker than ever, but the potato diet still works. Potatoes contains natural drug-like agents that affect inflammation, hunger, insulin, sleep, dreams, mood, and body weight. The potato is the best diet pill ever invented.

The potato hack is a short-term intervention (3-5 days) where one eats nothing but potatoes. This short mono-food experiment will strengthen your immune system and provide you with all of the nutrition you need to remain energetic, sleep great, and, as a side-effect, lose weight. The potato hack will help you develop a new relationship with food, hunger, taste, and yourself.

©2016 Tim Steele (P)2017 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"[Steele] lays out the painstakingly detailed science behind the magic contained in one of our most common staples, the potato, and the biological impact resistant starch can have on the body. Definitely worth the read to get the most comprehensive rundown on the topic." (Mark Sisson, author of The Primal Blueprint)

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Helpful, but WAY too much jargon

I love this concept, and I'm firmly convinced that the potato hack is there way to go. But there is a deluge of useless, overly-technical jargon in the second half of the book, which sounds like you're being read a lab report. I really wish I would've known that the last several chapters could be skipped entirely since I could've saved quite a bit of time trying to sift through it for any useful information. But alas, it wasn't there, and seems to only be fluff to make the book longer, which is entirely unnecessary.