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Publisher's Summary

When Elwood P. Dowd starts to introduce his imaginary friend, Harvey, a six-and-a-half-foot rabbit, to guests at a society party, his sister, Veta, has seen as much of his eccentric behavior as she can tolerate. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her daughter, Myrtle Mae, and their family from future embarrassment. Problems arise, however, when Veta herself is mistakenly assumed to be on the verge of lunacy when she explains to doctors that years of living with Elwood's hallucination have caused her to see Harvey also! The doctors commit Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out, the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When he shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood's delusion has had a strange influence on more than one of the doctors. Only at the end does Veta realize that maybe Harvey isn't so bad after all.

©2017 BN Publishing (P)2017 BN Publishing

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Odd characterization choices

Harvey is a theatre classic, —my husband and I will be part of a production this September— so to be clear, this review is of the audiobook recording only, not the play itself.

The narrator is clearly an actor and better than a lot of audiobook narrators I’ve listened to. But some of the character choices (particularly the female characters) are a bit off. And the voice he does for Dowd is inconsistent: initially he seems to be trying to do a Jimmy Stewart impression but quickly falls into something that sounds more like a very elderly southern gentleman. And certain lines conjure the image of Yogi Bear, all from the delivery and that doesn’t seem like the image one would want to inspire for this.

Overall not a bad performance, just a bit distracting at times