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Publisher's Summary

The concluding audiobook of McKillip's Riddle Master trilogy opens peacefully but soon places the listener in the midst of conflict and unrest. The Prince of Hed solves the puzzle of his future when he learns to harp the wind, discovers who the shape changers are, and understands his own relationship to Deth, harpist of the wizard Ohm.

Listen to more in the Riddle-Master trilogy.
©1979 Patricia A. McKillip (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

Locus Award, Best Fantasy Novel, 1980

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Performance

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Story

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Stunningly good

Patricia McKillip's trilogy is one of the best fantasy novels/series I've ever read. But listening to it on audio is even better. It is a literary quality series on par with the Earthsea Trilogy by Leguin, Tolkein, or the works of Guy Gavriel Kay. If you like these writers, you'll love this book. Start with Riddlemaster of Hed, then Heir of Sea and Fire, and finish with Harpist in the Wind. It is an incredible writing achievement. Enjoy.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jennie
  • Shingletown, CA, United States
  • 04-28-11

Wonderful reading

Mr. Prebble finished this trilogy with his beautifully modulated reading and dramatic timing. Thank you Audiobooks for recording one of my favorite fantasy books. Highly recommended.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Best Series I've Ever Read!

Once again Patricia A. McKillip has delivered an excellent story! Thankfully, this time it was read by Simon Prebble, reader of The Riddle Master of Hed. Excellent book and excellent narrator!

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Best of the trilogy

Satisfying conclusion to a classic fantasy series with a mystical bent, rather than endless butchery and swordplay. Many reviews stated that the series gained momentum here in book 3. I found that to be true, also. Furthermore, I felt the relationships were more fully explored in this book, whereas the first two books focused mainly on one character, with first Morgon (book 1) and then Raederle (2) coming into their own sense of purpose, power, destiny. I liked the rich interplay across various relationships in this book — in fact, I cried towards the end.

I was able to predict some of what happened, but McKillip didn't employ all the normal tropes (only some of them). The plot and world mythos is not simple, nor terribly complex, but as a listener I had to pay attention and replay several scenes.

Riddles (questions about history, decisions, and destiny) occur throughout the series, and those unanswered questions bedeviled me. But they were FINALLY and FULLY addressed here, as the story reached a resounding conclusion.

McKillip writes quite well, but WHY do authors feel the need to harbor and protect bloodthirsty, vicious, stone-cold psychos?? These guys killed thousands, including children. Why didn't the hero kill them???

The audio narration by Simon Prebble was not bad, but nor did it enhance the story. I could barely hear a difference between voices for Ohm, Danan, Har, and Deth, for example.

As with many fantasies, invented names for characters and places are hard to differentiate and remember via audio. In this case, I found it hard to hear the difference between similar-sounding words of one or two syllables: An, Aum, Ohm, El, Iff, Nun, Tel, Tol, Hed, Har, Hel, Herun, Hlurle, Heureu, Rood, Rork, Ymris, Yrth, etc. To better comprehend, I referred to a VERY helpful website: wizzley (dot) com (slash) riddle-master

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Turner
  • Hendersonville, TN, United States
  • 01-08-14

The Riddlemaster Trilogy is my all-time favorite!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would highly recommend this trilogy to anyone that is a fan of the fantasy genre. It tells a wonderful story of destiny, loss, mystery, and incredible power.

What did you like best about this story?

I love the world that the author created. It feels very middle age Irish/ Scottish/ English. The land is split up into multiple kingdoms governed by rulers who are thousands of years old and have a mystical binding with their land.

Which scene was your favorite?

The scene when the hero finally learns what his destiny is has to be one of my favorite moments in any book. Deeply satisfying.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, and I almost did.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Awesome story

What made the experience of listening to Harpist in The Wind the most enjoyable?

In the timeless storyline of mans struggle with change, this story ties the standard with Tolkien. I first read the series in '87, and marveled at the story line then. I discovered it as a audible and quickly bought the series.

What did you like best about this story?

Continous action

What about Simon Prebble’s performance did you like?

Well spoken, good pitch,

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

The same as the trilogy from Doubleday books..."the Stars of Hed"

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great end to a great story

The Harpist in the Wind is the final book in this series and focuses again on Morgon, Prince of Hed, and Deth, the High One's harpist. As Morgon searches for Deth, he learns more about his lineage and his powers and struggles to avoid where they are leading him. McKillip does a wonderful job of leading up to and developing the climax of this story and it was a joy reading again, 40+ years after I had first done so.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Still love the story!

Nice performance, glad the same person as book 1 is reading! Enjoyed listening, will do again.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Shaheen
  • West St. Paul, MN United States
  • 01-19-17

Hope he's a better harpist than riddle-master

I liked the narrator of this book very much. the book itself was decent enough ... the loose ends were mostly wrapped up, and the big mystery of the starbearer is finally revealed. Raederle unfortunately is relegated to a minor character, and many of the characters introduced in the previous two books have cameos at best. The problem for me was that through most of this book and at least half of the last the biggest mystery was blindingly obvious to me while remaining completely mysterious to the characters. This was frustrating, particularly given that Morgan is a riddle-master!

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Really Dense Story with poor narration

The narrator has a limited number of voices, and likes to speed through the dialogue. This makes it difficult to know who is saying what.

The author likes to use excessively dense descriptions, often to the detriment of the story.