• Summary

  • GirlTrek's epic 21-day walking meditation series to remember where we came from and to gather strength for the road ahead. We celebrate Black stories and the lessons of our ancestors to help guide us through these uncertain times. Each episode, is a conversation on learning, living and elevating to our highest self with guidance from lessons of the past. Hosted by GirlTrek Co-founders Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison. Produced by: Ebony Andrews
    © 2022 GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
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Episodes
  • May 3 2022

    We did it! Today marks the end of our first official month of walking and organizing for the 2022 GirlTrek season. We hope you are inspired as we head into the weekend. If so, plan to join us live tomorrow for the last day of Black History Bootcamp, The Crew Edition! Tomorrow will be a celebration of the ultimate crew - YOU!

    Be Alive | Beyonce:
    https://open.spotify.com/track/1RI4YQVFh7onQD07QuL8ND?si=586000c4d45948bc

    Celebration | Kool & The Gang:
    https://open.spotify.com/track/3K7Q9PHUWPTaknlbFPThn2?si=30bde051635a4e07

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    54 mins
  • Apr 30 2022

    It began in 1983 as a small picnic in a public park near the Atlanta University Center. It grew to become a cultural phenomenon, and the signature defining event for a generation of college students who were embracing freedom and challenging the status quo. 
     
    Freaknik. The notorious street party. The ultimate spring break. A meeting ground for Black people around the nation looking to turn up and turnout. 
     
    More than a festival, Freakink was a mass demonstration of Black culture and joy. An annual event that made the church ladies clutch their pearls. It had as many detractors as it had supporters, with the mayor of Atlanta calling the issue of Freaknik the most divisive issue he’d faced in public life. 
     
    So, how did a crew of young Black college students organize the most epic event in the country, and why was this event so polarizing? Find out on today’s walk as we take a stroll through the freak storm that was Freaknik while discussing race, class, youth, image, and the lasting legacy of this ultimate street party. 


    Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excepts referenced or played during this broadcast. You can find original content that was referenced or played here:

    Tootsee Roll | 69 Boyz:
    https://open.spotify.com/track/0TZiZV8pQ6RBlo3Fmd5LX1?si=XoocAbhlSSyJRoAo68Eluw

    My Boo | Ghost Town DJs:
    https://open.spotify.com/track/1kfg4YF0vJPpuKV3KsBbvU?si=jYsyXh8kTH-v5vTEpiPPcQ

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    35 mins
  • Apr 30 2022

    The manifesto for the Sojourners for Truth and Justice starts with: “A Call To Negro Women! Negro women of every town and state arise, come to Washington DC September 29 - October 1, and demand of the President, the Justice Department, the State Department, and the Congress absolute, unconditional redress of grievances.” 
     
    The year was 1951, post World War II. A group of 132 Black women responded to the call and traveled from across the US to the nation's capital. Among them were some of the most progressive and inspired Black women activists, artists, and thinkers of the time, including 
    Alice Childress, Shirley DuBois, Esther Cooper Jackson, Charlotta Bass, Louise Thompson Patterson, and Mary Church Terrell. Women whose stories we will discuss as part of today’s walk.  
     
    These women gathered, first at the home of Frederick Douglass, where 21-year old playwright  Lorraine Hansberry, addressed the crowd and read from the manifesto, “We can not, must not, and will no longer in sight of God or man sit by and watch our lives destroyed by an unreasonable and unreasoning hate that meets out to us every kind of death it is possible for a human being to die.” 
     
    With a clear agenda and unshakeable courage, the Sojourners for Truth and Justice took their fight directly to the White House, unapologetically focusing their message on the needs of Black women. Their work continued the legacy of Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth and was a precursor to the March on Washington, and every Women’s March of the present day. 
     
    Lace-up and learn with us today! These are the heroes that our community needs to know about. 


    Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excepts referenced or played during this broadcast. You can find original content that was referenced or played here:

    Stand By Me - Live | Tracy Chapman:
    https://open.spotify.com/track/2gs8HVC6KXOQe76XggzZH5?si=3f47498ce0aa48c7

    Beah Richards Speaks!:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJnpWUgOLHk

    You Gotta Believe | Rose Royce and the Pointer Sisters:
    https://open.spotify.com/track/50mQ8Vef5jQDLmwytu4f6m?si=be9042240a984774

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    47 mins

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