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Future Eves

Classic Science Fiction About Women by Women
Narrated by: Harriet Seed
Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

How did visionary women see the future?

Written between 1931 and 1979, these 13 stories show how different women have, in different eras, envisioned the future of their sex. Selecting its contents from lesser known writers, Future Eves presents Leslie F. Stone's novelette "The Conquest of Gola" (1931), an encounter with Earth males told from the point-of-view of an alien matriarch. So far ahead of its time, nothing like it would be attempted again in science-fiction until the work of Alice Sheldon (aka, James Tiptree, Jr.) in the 1970s.

Hazel Heald's novelette "The Man of Stone," is searingly feminist, all the more so since her heroine, like so many women of the time, takes her brutalized situation so much for granted.

In "Miss Millie's Rose" (1959), Joy Leache manages what so few male science-fiction writers of the era seemed able to do: portray a character whose psychology arises out of her future world and not our own.

Betsy Curtis' "The Goddess of Planet Delight" is a short novel in the classic mode that mixes a sociological puzzle with pointed satire, high-adventure, and romance.

Brace yourself for Djinn Faine's "Daughter of Eve", a story you will never forget, no matter how hard you try.

Plus stories by Florence Engel Randall, Evelyn Goldstein, Beth Elliot, Evelyn E. Smith, Marcia Kaimien, and others. Future Eves is fascinating to listen to, both as science-fiction and as an eye-opening view into futures past.

©2010 Page Turner (P)2018 Page Turner

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Sci-fi short stories by Women

I was given the opportunity by the Publisher to listen to the Audible version of this collection and I am very glad that I had the chance.

This is a collection of short stories written by women in the period from the 1930's to the 1950's, when most Sci-Fi was written by men. Some of the stories were true science fiction, like "The Conquest of Gola" and "The Goddess of Planet Delight". Then, there is the psychological story "Delilah", which tells the tale of an artist whose painting seems to be finishing itself.

"The Man of Stone" adds a Lovecraftian feel to this set and was very well written. This story touches on infidelity, spousal abuse, and murder with the perfect twist at the end.

"Days of Darkness" is a tale of an alien takeover (maybe) by a vampiric alien. Another contribution, "Alien Invasion" is full of angst as the woman in the story gives birth to an alien baby. "Miss Millie's Rose" introduces the reader to an old woman who is trying to die with dignity in spite of a cursed rose. This story was full of wonderful characters and some humor which added a lot to the tale.

"Cocktails at Eight" is a fun look at motherhood on Mars. Being the mother of twin 4 year old boys really isn't that different on Mars, even with a robot to help!

The last story, "The Last Day", is a poignant tale of possibly the last woman on earth. You can really feel the emotions in this one and is a story that I won't soon forget.

All of the stories are well-written, the characters well-developed and stories intriguing. Most of the tales had feminist tones, with strong women who were taking charge of their situation, even in the face of death. I greatly admire these authors since these stories were written well before Women's Lib was even thought about!

The narrator did an excellent job and added a lot to the enjoyment of the book.

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Great set of stories

This fascination set of short stories shows just how brilliant the female science fiction authors of the 1930’s – 1950’s were. These stories are full of surprises and they were well ahead of their time. The narrator did a great job with all the stories, bringing each to life and creating tension and showing emotion in all the right places. This is an entertaining set of stories and a great glimpse into the minds of female authors of the past.