Regular price: $25.09

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

A timeless collection of short stories about an imaginary small town, unified by the presence of Winesburg Eagle reporter George Willard, Winesburg, Ohio is, as H.L. Mencken said upon it's publication in 1919, "vivid, so full of insight, so shiningly life-like and glowing, that the book is lifted into a category all its own."

Presented here by the leading lights of modern American letters, Winesburg, Ohio reverberates with the passion of both Sherwood Anderson and the many writers whom he has influenced.

©2002 HarperCollinsPublishers, Inc. (P)2002 HarperCollinsPublishers, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    4

Performance

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    3

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    7
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Shannon
  • Chicago, IL, United States
  • 02-08-08

Good stories, amateur narration

I had never heard of this book or this author, but found it on a college reading list and decided to investigate. The stories are about the people in a small town some time around the turn of the 20th century. The stories seem quite well-written, only somewhat dated, and many of the characters and events in one story will connect with the characters and events in another. The five story arc of "Godliness" is unforgettable. Unfortunately, it appears that the narrators (a different one for each story) were selected because they were authors, rather than because they had any talent for narration. None of them is good, many of them are adequate, some of them are barely tolerable. In another annoying move, the authors discuss the book and its stories, but the discussion is placed at the end of the book, and the authors frequently don't say which story they are discussing, which makes their comments ("My story really shows development of character") difficult to follow. I can't understand why the producers chose these readers, but since I see there are two other versions of this book available, I suggest you try one of the others.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The beauty of Anderson's words is haunting.

The author evokes a deeply honest picture of Middlewest America after the Civil War.
The America of those days is changing so rapidly. The view from the main character's window includes a back alley, and an empty lot where someone has planted corn. The internal struggles of each character is lain bare for us to see.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

timeless

This must be listened to twice because it's twice as good as most things you'll ever listen to, 'nuf said.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Weird and dark

Not what I wanted in a book: creepy mentally perverted (as well as sexually perverted) short stories.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful