Regular price: $27.99

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Dubbed by Jane Smiley a “quintessential American voice”, Sandra Dallas has won over fans everywhere and become a frequent fixture on the New York Times best-seller list. Based on 19th-century history, True Sisters follows four women who pin their hopes for the future on a plan devised by Brigham Young to bring emigrants to Salt Lake City. Pushing two-wheeled handcarts loaded with all their life’s belongings, the women set off on the 1,300-mile journey from Iowa City - and soon become fast friends even as perils mount around them.

©2012 Sandra Dallas (P)2012 Recorded Books, LLC

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    39
  • 4 Stars
    27
  • 3 Stars
    20
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    5

Performance

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    43
  • 4 Stars
    22
  • 3 Stars
    13
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 3.9 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    34
  • 4 Stars
    23
  • 3 Stars
    17
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    6
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Karen
  • Houston, TX, United States
  • 06-16-12

Very Moving True to History Story

Any additional comments?

This brought me to tears on more than a few occasions. The strength and endurance of these women has to be admired. The reader did an awesome job with the Scottish and English accents. This one kept me engaged through out the entire novel.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Inspiring tale, great historical fiction!

What was one of the most memorable moments of True Sisters?

The strength of the women in the tale and the constant adversities.

Which scene was your favorite?

Crossing the river with their handcarts in the below freezing temperatures.

If you could rename True Sisters, what would you call it?

Perserverance through Adversity

Any additional comments?

I especially liked the women character who was not a mormon and her story of her travels and care for her family. How she had strength in herself to go on! This is an inspirational story of America.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Surviving nature and thoughtless leaders

TRUE SISTERS is a fictional account of a true event. Sandra Dallas has portrayed four women, and their families, as they take a real trip , in 1856, to cross 1,300 miles across America to reach the Mormon settlement in Salt Lake City, Utah. This group is following two others groups who have already crossed, but they are leaving too late for decent weather, and they are also going pushing handcarts which only allow them very view possessions. These handcarts also mean that everyone but the near dead, must walk the entire distance---through sickness, near starvation, frostbite, childbirth, and old age. Many will not survive the trip, but the church leaders berate anyone who wants to wait for better timing, with "you will burn in Hell because your faith isn't sufficient for you to REALLY be a Mormon!".

Four women are featured in this story. Their companionship holds them and their families together through these ordeals, and through deaths caused by the many hardships. I found these relationships to be quit compelling, as they grow in their abilities to think and survive as best they can, and learn to determine their own futures for themselves. Not being a Mormon myself, I found that part of this book less compelling. The men seemed overbearing and quit thoughtless at times, though there were a couple of "good guys" in the end. The story of the traveling, hardships, survival, and friendships is what made this book enjoyable for me.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Fascinating historically accurate tale of the women who survived the handcart trail to Salt Lake City, the promised Mormon Zion.

Such an interesting recounting of the horrific challenges met by the women of the early church of Mormons, pulling and pushing handcarts across the country during the fall and winter. Astonishing courage and faith.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

More realistic than most

Any additional comments?

The people were much more believable than most LDS novels I have read. Most characters are usually good or evil, but the people in this book were a mixture of both as normal people are. I really enjoyed this book and had trouble putting it down. I also LOVED that the story went all the way to the Salt Lake Valley instead of stopping when the rescuers arrived. I would definitely recommend this to others.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Nicoya
  • Idaho Falls Idaho
  • 09-28-17

From a Mormon

As a descendant of a handcart pioneer I cannot express my gratitude for Sandra Dallas' fair and detailed account of their faith and frustrations. I cannot imagine their trials and fortitude when compared to my own. One of our hymns sings of "blessed honored pioneers". Ms. Dallas has honored them with this story. Thank you for respecting our religion, our heritage, and their stories. This is a beautiful tribute to them.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Not the usually Dallas...

Sandra Dallas has become my go-to in audio books because of her endearing characters and vivid stories, but this fell a bit short to me. I enjoyed learning about the Mormon migration by the book on a whole was depressing, without any real conclusion. I also found some of the accents to be distracting.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Inaccurate

Being a member of The a Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints for 55 years, I found this story unappealing. I have enjoyed Sandra Dallas' books very much, but this one was terribly one sided on the side of women. The negativity of the characters and blanket portrayal of the men as being self-righteous, selfish and cruel towards the women was offensive. As in any age, I'm sure there were indeed such men, but there were, by and large men who were kind, loving and solicitous towards their wives. I am a descendant of such a man who was a member of the Martin handcart company and have read the journals of him and his wife. In summary, if the reader desires a more accurate account of the Mormon pioneers, True Sisters is not it.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Very engaging characters. Loved this book!

No I'm not LDS, haha. A really good story of an incredible journey. You won't be disappointed. Great performance too

1 of 2 people found this review helpful