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Publisher's Summary

Peter Marlow goes undercover to infiltrate the KGB. The Soviet intelligence agency's worst nightmare has come true: Besides the five directorates that oversee its operations, there lurks a sixth - a shadow directorate that may be plotting a coup against the Communist Party. Disruption of the KGB might spell trouble for Moscow, but for the British Intelligence, chaos in the Soviet Union means a chance to infiltrate. To make the most of the opportunity, Her Majesty's intelligence service turns to Peter Marlow, a disgraced former spy who has spent the last four years in jail. He is given his freedom in exchange for his espionage service. Peter assumes the mantle of George Graham, a KGB agent with more secrets than he's prepared to handle. The Sixth Directorate is the second audiobook in the Peter Marlow Mystery series, which also includes The Private Sector and The Valley of the Fox.

©1975 Joseph Hone (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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  • J.
  • Moorhead, MN, United States
  • 05-13-14

Like Le Carre only more so

As with Le Carre's stories, Horne's books focus on the world of double and triple agents. Not quite as opaque as Le Carre, but the amount of treasonous acts border on the absurd. Great premise suggesting the roots of the fall of the USSR here. Story gets less interesting when Marlow interacts with female agents. The number of coincidental characters meeting up also stretches credulity.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful