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The Satanic Verses Audiobook

The Satanic Verses

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Publisher's Summary

Inextricably linked with the fatwa called against its author in the wake of the novel’s publication, The Satanic Verses is, beyond that, a rich showcase for Salman Rushdie’s comic sensibilities, cultural observations, and unparalleled mastery of language. The tale of an Indian film star and a Bombay expatriate, Rushdie’s masterpiece was deservedly honored with the Whitbread Prize.

The story begins with a bang: the terrorist bombing of a London-bound jet in midflight. Two Indian actors of opposing sensibilities fall to earth, transformed into living symbols of what is angelic and evil. This is just the initial act in a magnificent odyssey that seamlessly merges the actual with the imagined. A book whose importance is eclipsed only by its quality, The Satanic Verses is a key work of our times.

©1988 Salman Rushdie (P)2011 Recorded Books, LLC

What the Critics Say

"No book in modern times has matched the uproar sparked by Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, which earned its author a death sentence. Furor aside, it is a marvelously erudite study of good and evil, a feast of language served up by a writer at the height of his powers, and a rollicking comic fable." (Amazon.com review)

"A rollercoaster ride over a vast landscape of the imagination." (The Guardian)

"A masterpiece." (The Sunday Times, London)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.7 (883 )
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3.7 (766 )
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4.1 (775 )
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3 star
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2 star
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1 star
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Performance
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  •  
    danseiden Brookline, VT, United States 10-29-12
    danseiden Brookline, VT, United States 10-29-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Confusing"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    This book is fascinating at times but you better have wikipedia ready and, more so, a knowledge of world religions. Especially, as a listen, where you can't really (or at least on my little ipod shuffle) stop and linger over confusing passages, this book is very difficult to comprehend. For example, after the plane crash, when he shifts right to Jahilia, I thought I had literally lost my place in the novel.


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    I really loved the twang of the various dialects. Rushdie is a genius of language and Dastor reads amazingly.


    Which character – as performed by Sam Dastor – was your favorite?

    I loved the way Jabril spoke to Saladin.


    If this book were a movie would you go see it?

    If there was a movie of this book it would start world war three!


    Any additional comments?

    My incredible, life long educator, fiercely agnostic, grandmother, since past, was a great admirer of Rushdie. I wanted to try him out. For now I have no plans to go on reading him. I need folks like Franzen, Irving, TC Boyle, and Eugenedes. Maybe when I've reached a more scholarly level I'll get more out of the work of this brave and masterful writer.

    6 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Parth Pachar 02-05-15
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A Masterpiece of Magical Realism!"
    Would you listen to The Satanic Verses again? Why?

    Yes sir! The story is fantastic, the writing is majestic and the narration is flawless. So why I heck wouldn't I?


    What did you like best about this story?

    The beautiful mixture of fancy and reality. It's like the spicy Chinese noodles with a touch of vodka ...Delicious! Leaves you wondering what was real and what was not. Throw in the typical Salman Rushdie sense of humor and you've got a classic in your hands.


    Which character – as performed by Sam Dastor – was your favorite?

    It was my first book on Audible and only after completing the novel did I realize that all voices were done by a solitary person and I was taken aback. Sam Dastor is that good! Indian accent, British accent, American accent, Persian accent, females, children, old people - he does it all incredibly well and smooth.
    If I had to choose one character though it'll be Gibreel Farishta, his accent is pretty humorous.


    If you could take any character from The Satanic Verses out to dinner, who would it be and why?

    Zeeny Vakil sounds hot! I wouldn't mind Allie, Pamela, Ayesha or even Gibreel and Saladin - they're all extremely interesting characters.


    Any additional comments?

    Knowledge of India and Islam is crucial or you'll miss out on a lot of jokes and references.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jennifer MIAMI, FL, United States 10-07-13
    Jennifer MIAMI, FL, United States 10-07-13 Member Since 2013
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    "Outstanding Performance!"
    Would you consider the audio edition of The Satanic Verses to be better than the print version?

    I haven't read the text version but can only imagine imagine that the print version is far more superior.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Satanic Verses?

    The book was very deeply layered and complex and can't say one particular moment stood out.


    Which character – as performed by Sam Dastor – was your favorite?

    Sam Dastor's performance was great for every single character and made the book possible for me to read. For me it was so complex that reading it on my own I would have taken weeks to finish.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sabine St Petersburg, FL, United States 11-28-12
    Sabine St Petersburg, FL, United States 11-28-12
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    "Hopefully there is a movie"

    After hearing Joseph Anton by Salman Rushdie & narrated by Sam Dastor, I felt I HAD to listen to this book and see what all the fuss was about. I remember the hubhub about the book when it first came out, but I never gave it a thought to pick it up and read it. Good thing I didn't back then, I would never have finished it. The names, I would have constantly stumbled over them. But maybe the story line would have been easier to understand in print?? The listen was extemely hard to follow. As best as I can tell, it follows the main characters through several of their "other lives" & how they are interwined through eternity?? I am just not sure. But Sam Dastor made the listen interesting. It was fun hearing him spout off all those Indian names like he lived there and then change accents to fit the characters. It was also very interesting to hear how Indians talk to each other. My only experience has been the overly polite version on the other line when you call tech support or at the gas station (sorry...do not mean to offend.)

    I listened through the entire thing, hoping for understanding. But it was confusing. I have to confess I just did not get the book. Nor do I get what all the drama was surrounding the book. It is just a book about ficticious characters. Whatever evil slams there were against Islam probably just went over the heads of most readers (as it did mine). So what was the big deal?

    Because parts of this were quite fascinating, while still confusing the heck out of me, I do hope this is made into a movie. Maybe seeing what is going on will help to understand it. The book is a part of history, whether you agree with it or not. It is important to read & understand, then appreciate all that Mr. Rushdie endured to get it published. Kudos to him for sticking it out! I don't know that I would have had the fortitude.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven 10-29-12
    Steven 10-29-12 Member Since 2015
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    "Just Doesn't Do It"

    I realized I had never experienced a book that was not only positively reviewed but created a world-wide controversy. This book didn't generate any excitement for me. Perhaps it's me.
    I wonder if everyone loved it.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kindle Customer 01-17-17 Member Since 2014
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    "Did not live up to the hype."

    the premise of this story is interesting but the author delivers it with too many asides and flashbacks making it hard to follow. the narrator does a excellent job of differentiating the various characters. I suspect that the many seeming mispronounced proper names was the doing of the producers but not having read the print version cannot say for certain.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ward Hammond 10-12-16 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I was one of those people"
    What made the experience of listening to The Satanic Verses the most enjoyable?

    You know the type, they are the loudest critics and yet have never even seen the movie or read the book which they are lambasting. I am ashamed to say that I vaguely remember condemning Salman Rushdie and this book without reading it in 1989, thinking he should have known better than to offend the Ayatollah. I wish I had been wise enough to condemn the fatwā which called for Rushdie's death. I wish I had been courageous enough to stand up for freedom of speech. Well now I have read The Satanic Verses and I loved it. No wonder Rushdie and Christopher Hitchens were friends. Rushdie and write! This is a bizarre story no doubt but so entertaining. There are a few good lessons buried in there too. I highly recommend the book. I'll be reading more of Rushdie's work. And I will be reading the books and watching the movies before passing judgment on them in the future.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    perspective 08-30-16
    perspective 08-30-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Outstanding- Brilliant"

    Humorous, tragic and poignant. Superbly written, exceptional narration. I would recommend this to anyone who respects satire and does not view religion too seriously.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christopher somerset, Australia 08-04-16
    Christopher somerset, Australia 08-04-16 Member Since 2010
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    "Head-bangingly difficult to make sense of."

    I'm no genius, nor am I a fool. However, this is a tough book to take on, whether in paper format or audio book. It's hard to make out which bits are supposed to be "reality", which bits "dreams" and which bits mental illness or just social comment. The writer has a complicated and at times almost impenetrable writing style which I found very difficult to get my head around. I'd recommend you ask the author which of the dozen or so works he called upon to create this epistle, and which you should read first, before embarking on this roller coaster of a book.
    There's a lot of good comedy in this book, which breaks up the tougher bits. But, undeniably, you need to read about the author, his background, and influences before you take this on. He expects you to know everything he knows, or you'll have no chance at all of getting much out of it.
    So, maybe a book for literary experts. Certainly not for the faint hearted, and not to be consumed in isolation, without some fairly deep background reading.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Seanzie 05-25-16
    Seanzie 05-25-16
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    "The 20th century equivalent to Brothers Karamazov"

    The storyline is somewhat difficult to follow, but the lyrical narration and a colorful conceptual pastiche of British and Indian life makes it as enjoyable as it is thought provoking. What eventually came out as controversial is really more so about implications and dog whistles, not so much any deliberate provocation on Rushdie's part. There is no moral lesson, religious or anti-religious (unlike Sarmago, for instance). Anyone with an interest in religious studies, Indian colonial history, or the tensions between West and Middle-East should check it out. I am an infrequent dabbler in fiction, but the historical significance of Rushdie's life is undeniable. In terms of style, one might say it blends the philosophical potency of Dostoevsky with the surrealism of Spanish fiction, to explore areas of culture and religion that are as rich and fertile as ever, but avoided because of interwoven taboos.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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