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Publisher's Summary

Summer's Path is the remarkable story of Don Newport, an engineer that comes face to face with his personal destiny under extraordinary circumstances. After losing his job and his health insurance, Don learns he has a terminal disease with only a few months left to live. On his death bed, he meets Robert, a brazen angel of death that promises to help Don with a graceful exit.

As Don prepares to say his last goodbyes to his loving wife, Robert attempts to change Don's perspective about his mortality and proposes an exceptionally unique option. Robert leads Don through an astounding meditation of life and death and reveals various healing and spiritual concepts including walk-ins, embodiment and soul destiny. On this magical journey of self realization, Don discovers that it's never too late to learn profound life lessons about ourselves and our loved ones.

©2009 Hay House; (P)2009 Hay House

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 2.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    125
  • 4 Stars
    126
  • 3 Stars
    198
  • 2 Stars
    195
  • 1 Stars
    359

Performance

  • 2.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    65
  • 4 Stars
    62
  • 3 Stars
    88
  • 2 Stars
    59
  • 1 Stars
    105

Story

  • 2.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    64
  • 4 Stars
    52
  • 3 Stars
    73
  • 2 Stars
    66
  • 1 Stars
    128
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  • Overall

Yikes! Thats BAD!

I truly disliked this book but continued on so I could find out how things turned out for the main character only to find out there is no resolution & I would need to wait for the next book and slog through that drivel only to most likely have to wait through the book after as this is planned to be a trilogy at least.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Just Awful

This one is a real stinker. Stay away from this unless you are a big fan of new age "spirituality" propaganda. It has wooden characters, a preachy tone and is very condescending towards anyone that would dare to disagree with its world-view. The story goes from bad to worse, and then from worse to worst. The characters are morally vacuous, but the narration assumes they are taking the moral high ground. I couldn't wait for it to finish -- and it wouldn't finish. It tried to transition into a "buddies road trip" type of plot that is almost laughable. My advise, in a word - "Don't."

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Sometimes, Death Comes Calling

On a scale from one to ten, I am less than enthusiastic for this work. The narrator, Diane Ray did alright but I think the abridger could be better called a butcher. Important elements of the story were left on the cutting room floor. For example, Don Newport pays a visit to his attorney friend to talk about taking care of his affairs after his death, then we don't ever see the attorney again. After the day the police came to tell Mrs. Newport that her husband's car was found in the bottom of a canyon with no sign of him, the poor woman disappears from the story. What happened to these folks? Did the attorney and Mrs. Newport strike up a romance? Was the huge medical expense problem resolved? No answers were provided. Instead, the abridged version goes on and on and on about new age pseudo religious stuff. It reminds me of the little tracks that Jehovah's Witnesses or the Pentecostals pass out.

In addition, the author seems to have admiration for those great unspoiled cultures in touch with nature and man's natural self. Should I be unkind and point out that these unspoiled cultures are ones where for instance, women are bought and sold like so many cows? Should I? No, I won't be unkind. I know that Western Civilization should get in touch with its natural self and learn from unspoiled cultures. Makes one wonder what lessons are to be learned. After all, Western Civilization only birthed religious freedom, individual rights, free speech and press, capitalism and on and on. What have the natural and unspoiled cultures given to the world? If one wants to find starvation, disease, slavery, oppression, and human misery, one only has to look to the unspoiled non-westernized parts of the planet. I would skip this book; there is nothing to be discovered here.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Patricia
  • Redding, CA, United States
  • 08-09-09

OY

The narration is so bad that it's painful. The voice inflections are all wrong and why in heaven's name did they have a female narrating for a book that is primarily a man's voice? Occasionally I think I'm about to get into the story and then it gets shallow and weird. I can't even finish listening to it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Looking a gift horse...

Uh, well, thanks. I guess.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Cecilia
  • Lithonia, GA, United States
  • 07-31-09

More of a lesson than a story

I don't know if it was the reader or the content, but much of this book sounded like a bad play.

Much of the "conversations" are a presentation of a philosophy the author wants to put present. The story presented in the book is stretched to fit what the author wants to say.

This book didn't have an ending and it seems it will be continued in another book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Unfulfilling

Summers Path is unsettling. It has mindshifting ideas that are ultimately ham handed. We slog past boring characters, irrelevant adjectives and explanations of obvious stuff. It did get really odd and interesting, but not until Chapter 6, a quarter of the way through. The audiobook has the additional handicap of being abridged, so the pacing and rhythm is weird. To boot, the narrator is just not a voice actor.

I was further bothered that the story does not reflect the medical realities of fast-moving cancer. And it only lightly touches on the emotional truths cancer brings to a loving, exhausted husband and wife.

Someday Summers Path will become a fun and ridiculous movie, but only with a lot of work. In this audiobook form, it is irritating.

Summers Path is a prequel to a new book, Waiting for Autumn; and the publishers marks on Autumn say it is a Young Adult title. That might explain why the narrator here speaks slowly, and with a 2-second pause of silence after every sentence. This book has none of the weight, or respect for the reader of, say, The Giver. It lacks the honestly felt emotions we can see in the YA books of Margaret Peterson Haddix. I once saw a bad Broadway murder mystery where a woman in the audience called out :: Somebody put this play out of its misery! :: I finally found the right place to quote her.

Hey, listen instead to the novel "Prodigal Summer:" the best narration by a living author; prowling heat and rain; real-people characters; and a story which can enjoy the human spirit, and let the good guys win.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Make it STOP

I can listen to just about anything. It was bad, but I was on the road, and needed to listen to something. But then, I reached a point in the book with the author felt it nesseary to keep repeating "..., and then she'll leave me" for what seemed like 1000 times. It was then that I left him. I'll give the book this, I've never wanted so much to find out how to delete a selection from my library so that I dont have to look at the title.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Diane
  • Caledonia, MS, USA
  • 06-01-09

A Waste Of My Time

Different- Not for my enjoyment--I did not listen to the whole thing, and I am glad I did not have to pay for this book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Could have been better

It could have been an interesting near-fantasy novel, but the plot tension never really climbs significantly. The author builds emotional ties to characters and then just drops them from the spotlight; he includes what seem like foreshadowing suspicions and then goes nowhere with them.

Then the second half especially reads like a New Age spiritual healing self-help book that doesn't make much sense. It ends abruptly in expectation of a sequel that is supposed to be somewhat autobiographical.

The narration is not bad, I guess.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful