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Publisher's Summary

A game of cards leads Flashman from the jungle death-house of Dahomey to the slave state of Mississippi as he dabbles in the slave trade in Volume III of the Flashman Papers.

When Flashman was inveigled into a game of pontoon with Disraeli and Lord George Bentinck, he was making an unconscious choice about his own future – would it lie in the House of Commons or the West African slave trade? Was there, for that matter, very much difference? Once again Flashman’s charm, cowardice, treachery, lechery, and fleetness of foot see the lovable rogue triumph by the skin of his chattering teeth.

©2012 George MacDonald Fraser (P)2012 HarperCollins Publishers Limited

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Profile Image for Fiona
  • Fiona
  • 06-17-17

Hoorah for Flashy!

I have loved the Fashion books for many years, so it's pretty certain I'd love the audiobook. And I did - wonderfully read.

This, like all the Fashion stories, is a brilliant story. The history is accurate, Flashman is a brilliant anti-hero, and the escapades he lands himself in - usually on account of chasing a woman - are just fabulous.

A real ribald romp of a book - brilliant!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Profile Image for Andy
  • Andy
  • 02-04-15

Flashman does it again

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, simple but great plot with nice twists

Who was your favorite character and why?

Flashman, for being a gentleman and yet so selfish

Have you listened to any of Rupert Penry-Jones’s other performances? How does this one compare?

I have listened to other books in the series and he does a good job, although one character is quite loud in his performance.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Flashman's at it again

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Profile Image for Jo Blogs
  • Jo Blogs
  • 12-06-14

Loved it, so un-pc

Would you consider the audio edition of Flash for Freedom! to be better than the print version?

Never read it

What did you like best about this story?

What a fab cad!

Which character – as performed by Rupert Penry-Jones – was your favourite?

err question

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

err another stupid question

Any additional comments?

Loved the book, great fun, great characters.

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Profile Image for Mr. S. C. Fadhley
  • Mr. S. C. Fadhley
  • 07-08-14

Another excellent Flashman novel

Penry-Jones has captured the utterly debauched Harry Flashman. It's a superb performance - he captures a wide range of bizarre characters and the irony of the increasingly difficult situations in which Harry Flashman finds himself.

All of the Flashman novels are excellent, and this is one of the better ones: I love the way that Fraser manages to find humour in the most difficult subjects: In this case the African slave-trade. Often books about this subject become mawkish or lecturing. This book is neither - it does not shy away from the horrors of slavery nor descend into any kind of self-pity.