Regular price: $15.48

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2012

The sequel to the Man Booker-winning Wolf Hall. "My boy Thomas, give him a dirty look and he’ll gouge your eye out. Trip him, and he’ll cut off your leg," says Walter Cromwell in the year 1500. "But if you don’t cut across him he’s a very gentleman. And he’ll stand anyone a drink." By 1535, Thomas Cromwell, the blacksmith’s son, is far from his humble origins. Chief Minister to Henry VIII, his fortunes have risen with those of Anne Boleyn, Henry’s second wife, for whose sake Henry has broken with Rome and created his own church. But Henry’s actions have forced England into dangerous isolation, and Anne has failed to do what she promised: bear a son to secure the Tudor line.

When Henry visits Wolf Hall, Cromwell watches as Henry falls in love with the silent, plain Jane Seymour. The minister sees what is at stake: not just the king’s pleasure, but the safety of the nation. As he eases a way through the sexual politics of the court, its miasma of gossip, he must negotiate a "truth" that will satisfy Henry and secure his own career. But neither minister nor king will emerge undamaged from the bloody theatre of Anne’s final days.

In Bring up the Bodies, sequel to the Man Booker Prize-winning Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel explores one of the most mystifying and frightening episodes in English history: the destruction of Anne Boleyn. This new novel is a speaking picture, an audacious vision of Tudor England that sheds its light on the modern world. It is the work of one of our great writers at the height of her powers.

©2012 Hilary Mantel (P)2012 HarperCollins Publishers Limited

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    7
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    13
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    12
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Wonderful ...👏👏👏

A wonderful way to tell history. A great story and and an excellent narrator. ✌

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Hard to fault

Would you listen to Bring Up the Bodies again? Why?

I already listened to it twice back-to-back – the first time I've done that with an Audible book.

What about Julian Rhind Tutt’s performance did you like?

Julian is a terrific narrator, breathing life into the various characters with accents and voices that weren't over the top. The narration has more dynamic range than some, so some of the quieter bits can get lost if you're in a somewhat noisy environment listening on headphones – but this is not a criticism of the narrator.

Any additional comments?

Would like to have had the book in its unabridged version.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Thomas Cromwell brought to life again

Would you listen to Bring Up the Bodies again? Why?

Yes, over and over again. Hilary Mantell's writing is masterly and is a joy to revisit.

What did you like best about this story?

Human faults are timeless, human strengths are timeless. This is a story about both strength and frailty, told with elegance, wit and skill.

What does Julian Rhind Tutt bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The narration is sublime, we are not read to but are listening to the characters dice and duel with each other.

Who was the most memorable character of Bring Up the Bodies and why?

There is only one character and that is Thomas Cromwell.

Any additional comments?

Listen once, listen twice and maybe more. You will be rewarded!

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Sukemin
  • singapore, Singapore
  • 06-04-12

Brilliant evocation of 16th Century England

What made the experience of listening to Bring Up the Bodies the most enjoyable?

Machinations of the King Henry the Eight's court

What other book might you compare Bring Up the Bodies to and why?

The first in the series Wolf Hall akin to the first movement of a symphony, dense and crowded, full of uncompleted narratives. Bring up the bodies is like the slow second movement, narratives that recall the first movement and one main theme, the downfall of Ann Boelyn.
There should be a third movement to compete the symphony.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

Could have been more like Simon Vance who was magnificent in Wolf Hall.

If you could take any character from Bring Up the Bodies out to dinner, who would it be and why?

Thomas Cromwell, a man of modern sensibilities, venal and pragmatic bureaucrat.

Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • martin acker
  • 06-10-13

Superb story

Brings the period to life and can be easily applied to the present day political machinations congrats to Hilary Mantell

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Colin
  • 02-12-13

Just isn't grabbing me

I only bought this title 2 days ago but already I'm struggling; the prose is rather meandering making it hard to follow, but mainly I'm finding the readers voice irritating; soft spoken and languid his voice would be great on a relaxation or meditation tape, but here it just sounds a monotonous drone. Very hard to follow the story; I'll persevere but I'm not holding out much hope...

4 of 6 people found this review helpful